Internet Architecture Board                            G. Huston, Editor
Internet-Draft                               Internet Architecture Board
Document: draft-iab-iana-00.txt                        December 13, 2002
Category: BCP
Expires: June 13, 2003


             Defining the Role and Function of the IETF-IANA

Status of this Memo

    This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
    all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026.

    Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
    Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
    other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
    Drafts.

    Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
    and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
    time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
    material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

    The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at http://
    www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt.

    The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
    http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

    This Internet-Draft will expire on June 13, 2003.

Copyright Notice

    Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2002).  All Rights Reserved.


Abstract

    Many IETF protocols make use of commonly defined values that are
    passed within protocol objects.  To ensure consistent interpretation
    of these values between independent implementations, there is a need
    to ensure that the values and associated semantic intent are uniquely
    defined.  The IETF uses a registry function to record these protocol
    values and their associated semantic intent.  In this memo the
    registry function is referred to as the IETF Internet Assigned
    Numbers Authority (IETF- IANA).  This document provides a description
    of this function.



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 1]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


1. Introduction

    Many IETF protocols make use of commonly defined values that are
    passed within protocol objects.  To ensure consistent interpretation
    of these values between independent implementations, there is a need
    to ensure that the values and associated semantic intent are uniquely
    defined.  The IETF uses a single registry to register these protocol
    values and their associated semantic intent.  Historically, this
    registry is referred to as the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
    (IANA).  In this context the IANA function has included both the
    registration of protocol-specific identifier values (e.g.  TCP
    parameters) as well as the registration of various numbering and name
    resources that are used within public Internet networks (e.g.  IPv4
    address allocations).  In this document a distinction is drawn
    between the registration of protocol parameters for protocols defined
    in IETF RFCs, and other IANA functions.  The new term to describe the
    IETF-related activity is the "IETF-IANA".  The document describes
    this IETF-IANA function as it applies to the IETF Internet Standards
    Process.  [1]


2. Definition of IETF-IANA

    The Internet Standards document, STD 2, published in October 1994,
    defined the role of the IANA as follows:

       The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is the central
       coordinator for the assignment of unique parameter values for
       Internet protocols.  The IANA is chartered by the Internet Society
       (ISOC) and the Federal Network Council (FNC) to act as the
       clearinghouse to assign and coordinate the use of numerous
       Internet protocol parameters.

       The Internet protocol suite, as defined by the Internet
       Engineering Task Force (IETF) and its steering group (the IESG),
       contains numerous parameters, such as internet protocol addresses,
       domain names, autonomous system numbers (used in some routing
       protocols), protocol numbers, port numbers, management information
       base object identifiers, including private enterprise numbers, and
       many others.

       The common use of the Internet protocols by the Internet community
       requires that the particular values used in these parameter fields
       be assigned uniquely.  It is the task of the IANA to make those
       unique assignments as requested and to maintain a registry of the
       currently assigned values.  [2]

    The definition of the IETF-IANA role is provided in BCP 26:



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 2]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


       Many protocols make use of identifiers consisting of constants and
       other well-known values.  Even after a protocol has been defined
       and deployment has begun, new values may need to be assigned
       (e.g., for a new option type in DHCP, or a new encryption or
       authentication algorithm for IPSec).  To insure that such
       quantities have consistent values and interpretations in different
       implementations, their assignment must be administered by a
       central authority.  For IETF protocols, that role is provided by
       the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).  [3]


3. Publication of IETF-IANA Assignments

    The current mode of publication of IETF-IANA assignments is described
    in the Informational Document RFC 3232 [4], published in January
    2002:

       From November 1977 through October 1994, the Internet Assigned
       Numbers Authority (IANA) periodically published tables of the
       Internet protocol parameter assignments in RFCs entitled,
       "Assigned Numbers".  The most current of these Assigned Numbers
       RFCs had Standard status and carried the designation: STD 2.  At
       this time, the latest STD 2 is RFC 1700.

       Since 1994, this sequence of RFCs have been replaced by an online
       database accessible through a web page (currently, www.iana.org).
       The purpose of the present RFC is to note this fact and to
       officially obsolete RFC 1700, whose status changes to Historic.
       RFC 1700 is obsolete, and its values are incomplete and in some
       cases may be wrong.  [4]


4. The Procedures related to IETF-IANA Parameter Management

    IETF-IANA actions are defined through the inclusion of an "IANA
    Considerations" section in Internet Standards documents, as described
    in RFC 2434 [3].  There are also RFCs that specifically address IANA
    considerations for particular protocols, such as RFC 2780 [5], RFC
    2939 [6], and RFC 2978 [7].


5. The Operation of the IETF-IANA

    As documented in the IAB Charter [8], the role of the Internet
    Architecture Board includes responsibility for the IANA function.
    Specifically, the IAB, acting on behalf of the IETF, approves the
    appointment of an organization to act as IANA on behalf of the IETF,
    and also approves the terms and conditions of this delegation of the



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 3]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


    IANA function.

    The IANA has a non-voting liaison with the IAB to facilitate clear
    communications and effective operation of the IETF-IANA function.

    The technical direction of the IANA with respect to IETF-IANA is
    provided by the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG).
    [RFC2850] The IETF-IANA has a non-voting liaison with the IESG to
    facilitate clear communications and effective operation of the IETF-
    IANA function.


6. Current IETF-IANA Protocol Parameter Assignments

    The list of current IETF-IANA protocols for which parameter
    assignments are registered by IETF-IANA is listed in reference [9].

    With reference to the IETF-IANA, the protocol parameters that are
    excluded from the scope of the IETF-IANA role are the registration of
    unicast IPv4 address blocks, unicast IPv6 address blocks, Autonomous
    System blocks, and top level delegations within the Domain Name
    System, as they are considered to be outside the scope of the IETF-
    IANA as defined in Section 2 of this document.


7. A Description of the Operation and Responsibilities of the IETF- IANA

    This section describes the operation and role of the Internet
    Engineering Task Force - Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IETF-
    IANA), and the roles of related bodies with reference to the IETF-
    IANA function.

    7.1 Introduction

    Many protocols make use of identifiers consisting of constants and
    other well-known values.  Even after a protocol has been defined and
    deployment has begun, new values may need to be assigned (e.g., for a
    new option type in DHCP, or a new encryption or authentication
    algorithm for IPSec).  To insure that such quantities have consistent
    values and interpretations in different implementations, their
    assignment must be administered by a central authority.  For IETF
    protocols, that role is provided by the IETF-IANA.

    7.2 IETF-IANA Role

    The IETF-IANA is a function undertaken under the auspices of the
    Internet Architecture Board (IAB).




IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 4]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


    The roles of the IETF-IANA are as follows:


    -  Review and Advise

          The IETF-IANA reviews Internet-Drafts that are being considered
          by the Internet Engineering Task Force Steering Group (IESG),
          with the objective of offering advice to the IESG regarding the
          need for an IANA Considerations section, whether such a
          section, when required, is clear in terms of direction to IETF-
          IANA and whether the section is consistent with the current
          published IETF-IANA Guidelines.


    -  Registry

          The IETF-IANA operates a registry of protocol parameter
          assignments.

          The IETF-IANA registers Internet protocol parameters only as
          directed by the criteria and procedures specified in RFCs,
          including Proposed, Draft and full Internet Standards and Best
          Current Practice documents, and any other RFC that calls for
          IANA assignment.  If they are not so specified, or in case of
          ambiguity, IETF-IANA will continue to assign and register
          Internet protocol parameters that have traditionally been
          registered by IANA in the past, following past and current
          practice for such assignments, unless otherwise directed by the
          IESG.

          This registry includes:

          +  all protocol parameters that are managed by IETF-IANA,

          +  for each protocol parameter, a reference to the RFC document
             that describes the parameter and the associated IANA
             Considerations concerning the parameter, and

          +  for each registration of a protocol parameter, the source of
             the registration and the date of the registration.

          If in doubt or in case of a technical dispute, the IETF-IANA
          will seek and follow technical guidance exclusively from the
          IESG.  Where appropriate the IESG will appoint an expert to
          advise IANA.

          The IETF-IANA will work with the IETF to develop any missing
          criteria and procedures over time, which the IETF-IANA will



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 5]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


          adopt when so instructed by the IESG.

          The registry operates as a public registry, and the contents of
          the registry are openly available to the public, on-line and
          free of charge.

          The IETF-IANA assigns protocol parameter values in accordance
          with the policy associated with the protocol parameter.  (Some
          policies are listed in RFC2434.  [3])


    -  Mailing Lists

          The IETF-IANA operates public mailing lists as specified in
          IANA Considerations.  Such lists are designated for the purpose
          of review of assignment proposals in conjunction with a
          designated expert review function.


    -  Liaison

          The IETF-IANA designates an individual to act as a non-voting
          liaison to the IAB.

          The IETF-IANA designates an individual to act as a non-voting
          liaison to the IESG.  The IETF-IANA liaises with the IESG
          regarding the provision of advice to the IESG on IETF protocol
          parameters as well as the IANA Considerations section of
          Internet-drafts that are being reviewed for publication as an
          RFC.


    -  Reporting

          The IETF-IANA will submit periodic reports to the IAB
          concerning IETF-IANA operational performance of the registry
          function.

          The IETF-IANA will undertake periodic reports to the IETF
          Plenary concerning the status of the IETF- IANA role.

          The IETF-IANA will publish an annual report describing the
          status of the IETF-IANA function and a summary of performance
          indicators.


    -  Intellectual Property Rights and the IETF-IANA




IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 6]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


          IETF-IANA assigned values are published and made available free
          of any charges and free of any constraints relating to further
          redistribution, with the caveat that the IETF-IANA assignment
          information may not be modified in any redistributed copy.

          Any intellectual property rights of IETF-IANA assignment
          information, including the IETF-IANA registry and its contents,
          are to be held by the IETF and ISOC, and all IETF-IANA
          publications relating to assignment information are to be
          published under the terms of Section 10 of RFC2026, and are to
          include the copyright notice as documented in Section 10.4 (C)
          of RFC2026.  [1]

    7.3 IAB role

    The IETF-IANA is a function undertaken under the auspices of the
    Internet Architecture Board (IAB).

    The IAB has the responsibility to, from time to time, review the
    current description of the IETF-IANA function and to adopt amendments
    relating to its role and mode of operation of the IETF-IANA according
    to the best interests of the IETF.

    The IAB has the responsibility to select an organization to undertake
    the delegated functions of the IETF-IANA.

    The IAB has the responsibility to determine the terms and conditions
    of this delegated role.  Such terms and conditions should ensure that
    the IETF-IANA operates in a manner that is fully conformant to the
    functions described in this document.  In addition, such terms and
    conditions must not restrict the rights and interests of the IETF
    with respect to the IETF-IANA function.

    The IETF-IANA designates a non-voting liaison to the IAB to
    facilitate clear communications and effective operation of the IETF-
    IANA function.

    7.4 IESG Role

    The IESG is responsible for the technical direction of the IETF-IANA.
    Such technical direction is provided through the adoption of IETF RFC
    documents within the "IANA Considerations" section of such documents,
    or as stand-alone "IANA Considerations" RFC documents.

    The IESG shall ensure that the review of Internet-Drafts that are
    offered for publications as RFCs ensures that IANA Considerations
    sections are present when needed, and that IANA Considerations
    sections conform to the current published guidelines.



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 7]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


    The IETF-IANA designates a non-voting liaison to the IESG to
    facilitate clear communications and effective operation of the IETF-
    IANA function.

    7.5 Internet Society Role

    Any intellectual property rights of IETF-IANA assignment information,
    including the IETF-IANA registry and its contents, and all IETF-IANA
    publications, are to be held by the Internet Society on behalf of the
    IETF.


8. Acknowledgement

    This document is adapted from RFC2434 [3], and has been modified to
    include explicit reference to Intellectual Property Rights, and the
    roles of the IAB and IESG in relation to the IETF-IANA function.

    The Internet Architecture Board acknowledges the assistance provided
    by reviewers of earlier drafts of this document, including Scott
    Bradner.


9. References

    [1]   Bradner, S., "The Internet Standards Process -- Revision 3",
          RFC 2026, BCP 9, October 1996.

    [2]   Reynolds, J. and J. Postel, "Assigned Numbers", RFC 1700, STD
          2, October 1994.

    [3]   Narten, T. and H. Alvestrand, "Guidelines for Writing an IANA
          Considerations Section in RFCs", RFC 2434, BCP 26, October
          1998.

    [4]   Reynolds, J., "Assigned Numbers: RFC 1700 is Replaced by an On-
          line Database", RFC 3232, January 2002.

    [5]   Bradner, S. and V. Paxson, "IANA Allocation Guidelines For
          Values In the Internet Protocol and Related Headers", RFC 2780,
          BCP 37, March 2000.

    [6]   Droms, R., "Procedures and IANA Guidelines for Definition of
          New DHCP Options and Message Types", RFC 2939, BCP 43,
          September 2000.

    [7]   Freed, N. and J. Postel, "IANA Charset Registration
          Procedures", RFC 2978, BCP 19, October 2000.



IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 8]


Internet-Draft                  IETF-IANA                  December 2002


    [8]   Carpenter, B., "Charter of the Internet Architecture Board
          (IAB)" BCP39, RFC 2850, May 2000.

    [9] "IANA Protocol Numbers and Assignment Services" available online
          as http://www.iana.org/numbers.htm

    [10] Correspondence from Esther Dyson, Interim Chairman, ICANN to
          Scott Bradner, Brian Carpenter and Fred Baker of the IETF, Feb
          25 1999, http://www.icann.org/correspondence/bradner-
          dyson-25feb99.htm


10.  Security Considerations

    This document does not propose any new protocols, and therefore does
     not involve any security considerations in that sense.


Author

    Internet Architecture Board
    EMail: iab@iab.org

    IAB Membership at time this document was completed:
       Harald Alvestrand
       Ran Atkinson
       Rob Austein
       Fred Baker
       Leslie Daigle
       Steve Deering
       Sally Floyd
       Ted Hardie
       Geoff Huston
       Charlie Kaufman
       James Kempf
       Eric Rescorla
       Mike St. Johns














IAB                       Expires June 13, 2003                 [Page 9]