16ng Working Group                                        J. Jee, Editor
Internet-Draft                                                      ETRI
Intended status: Informational                            S. Madanapalli
Expires: May 21, 2008                                          LogicaCMG
                                                               J. Mandin
                                                                  Runcom
                                                           G. Montenegro
                                                               Microsoft
                                                                 S. Park
                                                     Samsung Electronics
                                                               M. Riegel
                                                                     NSN
                                                       November 18, 2007


               IP over 802.16 Problem Statement and Goals
                    draft-ietf-16ng-ps-goals-03.txt

Status of this Memo

   By submitting this Internet-Draft, each author represents that any
   applicable patent or other IPR claims of which he or she is aware
   have been or will be disclosed, and any of which he or she becomes
   aware will be disclosed, in accordance with Section 6 of BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 21, 2008.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2007).

Abstract

   This document specifies problems in running the IETF IP protocols



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   over IEEE 802.16 networks by identifying specific gaps in the 802.16
   MAC for IPv4 and IPv6 support.  This document also provides an
   overview of IEEE 802.16 network characteristics and convergence
   sublayers.  The common terminology to be used for the base guideline
   while defining the solution frameworks is also presented.


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.  Overview of the IEEE 802.16-2004 MAC layer . . . . . . . . . .  5
     3.1.  Transport Connections  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     3.2.  802.16 PDU format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     3.3.  802.16 Convergence Sublayer  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   4.  IP over IEEE 802.16 Problem Statement and Goals  . . . . . . .  7
     4.1.  Root Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     4.2.  Point-to-Point Link model for IP CS: Problems  . . . . . .  9
     4.3.  Ethernet like Link model for Ethernet CS: Problems . . . . 10
     4.4.  IP over IEEE 802.16 Goals  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   5.  IANA Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   7.  Acknowledgment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   8.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     8.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     8.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 14























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1.  Introduction

   Broadband Wireless Access networks address the inadequacies of low
   bandwidth wireless communication for user requirements such as high
   quality data/voice service, fast mobility, wide coverage, etc.  The
   IEEE 802.16 Working Group on Broadband Wireless Access Standards
   develops standards and recommended practices to support the
   development and deployment of broadband Wireless Metropolitan Area
   Networks [IEEE802.16].

   Recently, the WiMAX Forum, and, in particular, its NWG (Network
   Working Group) is defining the IEEE 802.16 network architecture
   (e.g., IPv4, IPv6, Mobility, Interworking with different networks,
   AAA, etc).  The NWG is thus taking on work at layers above those
   defined by the IEEE 802 standards (typically limited to the physical
   and link layers only).  Similarly, WiBro (Wireless Broadband), a
   Korean effort which focuses on the 2.3 GHz spectrum band, is also
   based on the IEEE 802.16 specification [IEEE802.16].

   802.16 [IEEE802.16] is point-to-point and connection-oriented at the
   MAC, physically arranged in a point-to-multipoint structure with the
   BS terminating one end of each connection and an individual SS
   terminating the other end of each connection.  The 802.16 convergence
   sublayer (CS) is at the uppermost part of the MAC that is responsible
   for assigning transmit-direction Service Data Units (originating from
   a higher layer application - eg. an IP or Ethernet at the BS or SS)
   to a specific outbound transport connection. 802.16 defines two
   convergence sublayer types, the ATM CS and the Packet CS.  The IP
   Specific Subpart (IP CS) and the 802.3 Ethernet Specific Subpart
   (Ethernet CS) of Packet CS is within the current 16ng WG scope.

   There exists complexity in configuring the IP Subnet over IEEE 802.16
   network because of its point-to-point connection oriented feature and
   the existence of IP CS and Ethernet CS which assume different higher
   layer functionality.  IP Subnet is a topological area that uses the
   same IP address prefix where that prefix is not further subdivided
   except into individual addresses as specified from [RFC4903].  The IP
   Subnet configuration is dependent on the underlying link layer's
   characteristic and decides the overall IP operation on the network.
   The IP CS and Ethernet CS of IEEE 802.16 assume different higher
   layer capability, like the IP routing functionality in case of IP CS
   and the bridging functionality in case of Ethernet CS.  This means
   that underlying link layer's characteristics beneath IP can change
   according to the adopted convergence sublayers.

   This document provides the feasible IP Subnet model for each IP CS
   and Ethernet CS and specifies the problems in running IP protocols
   for each case.  This document also presents an overview of 802.16



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   network characteristics specifically focusing on the convergence
   sublayers and the common terminology to be used for the base
   guideline while defining solution frameworks.


2.  Terminology

   Subscriber Station (SS): An end-user equipment that provides
   connectivity to the 802.16 networks.  It can be either fixed/nomadic
   or mobile equipment.  In mobile environment, SS represents the Mobile
   Subscriber Station (MS) introduced in [IEEE802.16e].

   Base Station (BS): A generalized equipment sets providing
   connectivity, management, and control between the subscriber station
   and the 802.16 networks.

   Access Router (AR): An entity that performs an IP routing function to
   provide IP connectivity for subscriber station (SS or MS).

   Protocol Data Unit (PDU): This refers to the data format passed from
   the lower edge of the 802.16 MAC to the 802.16 PHY, which typically
   contains Service Data Unit data after fragmentation, encryption, etc.

   Service Data Unit (SDU): This refers to the data format passed to the
   upper edge of the 802.16 MAC

   IP Subnet: Topological area that uses the same IP address prefix
   where that prefix is not further subdivided except into individual
   addresses as specified from [RFC4903].

   Link: Topological area bounded by routers which decrement the IPv4
   TTL or IPv6 Hop Limit when forwarding the packet as specified from
   [RFC4903].

   Transport Connection: The MAC layer connection in 802.16 between a
   SS(MS) and BS with a specific QoS attributes.  Several types of
   connections are defined and these include broadcast, unicast and
   multicast.  Each transport connection is uniquely identified by a 16-
   bit connection identifier (CID).  A transport connection is a unique
   connection intended for user traffic.  The scope of the transport
   connection is between the SS(MS) and the BS.

   Connection Identifier (CID): A 16-bit value that identifies a
   connection to equivalent peers in the 802.16 MAC of the SS(MS) and
   BS.

   Ethernet CS: It means 802.3/Ethernet CS specific part of the Packet
   CS defined in 802.16 STD.



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   802.1Q CS: It means 802.1Q (VLAN) specific part of the Packet CS
   defined in 802.16 STD.

   IP CS: It means IP specific subpart of the Packet CS defined in
   802.16 STD.

   IPv4 CS: It means IP specific subpart of the Packet CS, Classifier 1
   (Packet, IPv4)

   IPv6 CS: It means IP specific subpart of the Packet CS, Classifier 2
   (Packet, IPv6).


3.  Overview of the IEEE 802.16-2004 MAC layer

   802.16 [IEEE802.16] is point-to-point and connection-oriented at the
   MAC, physically arranged in a point-to-multipoint structure with the
   BS terminating one end of each connection and an individual SS
   terminating the other end of each connection.  Each node in the
   network possesses a 48-bit MAC address (though in the Base Station
   this 48-bit unique identifier is called "BSId").  The BS and SS learn
   each others' MAC Address/BSId during the SS's entry into the network.

3.1.  Transport Connections

   User data traffic in both the BS-bound (uplink) and SS-bound
   (downlink) directions is carried on unidirectional "transport
   connections".  Each transport connection has a particular set of
   associated parameters indicating characteristics such as
   cryptographic suite and quality-of-service.

   After successful entry of a SS to the 802.16 network, no data traffic
   is possible - as there are as yet no transport connections between
   the BS and SS.  Transport connections are established by a 3-message
   signaling sequence within the MAC layer (usually initiated by the
   BS).

   A downlink-direction transport connection is regarded as "multicast"
   if it has been made available (via MAC signaling) to more than one
   SS.  Uplink-direction connections are always unicast.

3.2.  802.16 PDU format

   An 802.16 PDU (ie. the format that is transmitted over the airlink)
   consists of a Generic MAC header, various optional subheaders, and a
   data payload.

   The 802.16 Generic MAC header carries the Connection Identifier (CID)



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   of the connection with which the PDU is associated.  We should
   observe that there is no source or destination address present in the
   raw 802.16 MAC header.

3.3.  802.16 Convergence Sublayer

   The 802.16 convergence sublayer (CS) is the component of the MAC that
   is responsible for mapping between the MAC service and the internal
   connection oriented service of the MAC CPS (Common Part Sublayer),
   through classification and encapsulation.  The classification process
   assigns transmit-direction Service Data Units (originating from a
   higher layer application - eg. an IP stack at the BS or SS) to a
   specific outbound transport connection.  The convergence sublayer
   maintains an ordered "classifier table".  Each entry in the
   classifier table includes a classifier and a target CID.  A
   classifier, in turn, consists of a conjunction of one or more
   subclassifiers - where each subclassifier specifies a packet field
   (eg. the destination MAC address in an Ethernet frame, or the TOS
   field of an IP datagram contained in an Ethernet frame) together with
   a particular value or range of values for the field.  To perform
   classification on an outbound Service Data Unit, the convergence
   sublayer proceeds from the first entry of the classifier table to the
   last, and evaluates the fields of the Service Data Unit for a match
   with the table entry's classifier when a match is found, the
   convergence sublayer associates the Service Data Unit with the target
   CID (for eventual transmission), and the remainder of the 802.16 MAC
   and PHY processing can take place.

   802.16 defines two convergence sublayer types, the ATM CS and the
   Packet CS.  The ATM CS supports ATM directly.  The Packet CS is
   subdivided into three specific subparts.

   o "The IP Specific Subpart" carries IP packets over a point-to-point
   connection.

   o "The 802.3 Ethernet Specific Subpart" carries packets encoded in
   the 802.3/Ethernet packet format with 802.3 style headers.

   o "The 802.1Q VLAN Specific Subpart" carries 802 style packets that
   contain 802.1Q VLAN Tags.

   Classifiers applied to connections at the time of connection
   establishment further classifies and subdivides the nature of the
   traffic over a connection.

   The classifications that apply to the Ethernet CS include packet over
   the 802.3/Ethernet CS, IPv4 over the 802.3/Ethernet CS, IPv6 over the
   802.3/Ethernet CS, 802.3/Ethernet CS with ROHC header compression and



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   802.3/Ethernet with ECRTP header compression.

   The classifications that apply to the 802.1Q/VLAN CS include IPv4
   over 802.1Q/VLAN and IPv6 over 802.1Q/VLAN.

   It should be noted that while the 802.3/Ethernet CS has a packet
   classification that does not restrict the IP version (packet over the
   802.3/Ethernet CS), the IP CS and 802.1Q/VLAN CS do.  All the IP
   classifiers for those CSs are either IPv4 or IPv6.

   The classifiers enable the MAC to be sure of the presence of fields
   in the headers and so to be able to apply the payload header
   suppression (PHS) feature of 802.16 to those headers.

   For the sake of brevity in this document, the following naming
   conventions will be used for particular classifications of particular
   subparts of particular CSs.

   o IPv4 CS: Packet CS, IP Specific Subpart, Classifier 1 (Packet,
   IPv4)

   o IPv6 CS: Packet CS, IP Specific Subpart, Classifier 2 (Packet,
   IPv6)

   o Ethernet CS: Packet CS, 802.3/Ethernet Subpart, Classifier 3
   (Packet, 802.3/Ethernet)

   An implementation of 802.16 can support multiple CS types.

   We can observe that the CS type, subpart and classification actually
   defines the type of data interface (eg.  IPv4/IPv6 or 802.3) that is
   presented by 802.16 to the higher layer application.


4.  IP over IEEE 802.16 Problem Statement and Goals

4.1.  Root Problem

   The key issue when deploying IP over IEEE 802.16 network is how to
   configure an IP Subnet over that link which is connection-oriented
   and point-to-point in the MAC level.  IP Subnet is a topological area
   that uses the same IP address prefix where that prefix is not further
   subdivided except into individual addresses.  [RFC4903] There are
   three different IP Subnet models [RFC4968] that are possible for
   802.16 network:

   1) Point-to-point Link Model




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   2) Ethernet like Link Model

   3) Shared IPv6 Prefix Link Model

   The specific problems and issues when adopting the above IP Subnet
   models to the IEEE 802.16 network are like below:

   In the first point-to-point link model, each SS under a BS resides on
   the different IP Subnets.  Therefore, only a certain SS and an AR
   exist under an IP Subnet and IP packets with destination address of
   link local scope are delivered only within the point-to-point link
   between a SS and an AR.  The PPP [RFC1661] has been widely used for
   this kind of point-to-point link.  However, the direct use of PPP is
   not possible on the 802.16 network because the 802.16 does not define
   a convergence sublayer which can encapsulate and decapsulate PPP
   frames.  Therefore, there needs to be a mechanism to provide a point-
   to-point link between a SS and an AR in case of IP CS.  The other
   alternative is to utilize the PPP over Ethernet by using the Ethernet
   CS.  However, Ethernet CS assumes the upper layer's bridging
   functionality to realize the Ethernet like link model.

   In the second Ethernet like link model, all SSs under an AR reside on
   the same IP Subnet.  This also applies when SSs are connected with
   different BSs.  This Ethernet like link model assumes that underlying
   link layer provides the equivalent functionality like Ethernet, for
   example, native broadcast and multicast.  It seems feasible to apply
   the 802.16's Ethernet CS to configure this link model.  However, the
   802.16's MAC feature is still connection-oriented not providing
   multicast and broadcast connection for IP packet transfer.  There
   needs mechanisms like IEEE 802.1D to realize multicast and broadcast
   for Ethernet CS.  Moreover, the frequent IP multicast and broadcast
   signaling within the IP subnet like Ethernet needs to be avoided not
   to wake up sleep/idle [IEEE802.16e] SSs.

   The last shared IPv6 prefix link model eventually results in multi-
   link subnet problems [RFC4903].  In 802.16, BS assigns separate
   802.16 connections for SSs.  Therefore, SSs are placed on the
   different links.  In this situation, distributing shared IPv6 prefix
   for SSs which are placed on the different links causes the multi-link
   subnet problems.  This is valid for IP CS and even to the Ethernet CS
   if any bridging functionality is not implemented on top of BS or
   between BS and AR.

   We identified the feasible IP Subnet models for IEEE 802.16 networks
   depending on the convergence sublayers.  At the current stage, only
   the IP CS and Ethernet CS of IEEE 802.16 are within the 16ng scope.
   Followings are the feasible IP Subnet models for each convergence
   sublayer used.



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   1.  Point-to-Point Link model for IP CS.

   2.  Ethernet like Link Model for Ethernet CS.

   According to the point-to-point feature of 802.16's MAC, the Point-
   to-Point link model is the feasible IP Subnet model for IP CS under
   considering the multilink subnet problems.  For the Ethernet CS, the
   Ethernet like link model is the feasible IP Subnet model.  However,
   in this model unnecessary multicast and broadcast packets within an
   IP Subnet should be minimized.

4.2.  Point-to-Point Link model for IP CS: Problems

   - Address Resolution:

   Address Resolution is the process by which IP nodes determine the
   link- layer address of a destination node on the same IP Subnet given
   only the destination's IP address.  In case of IPCS, the ARP cache or
   Neighbor cache as 802.16 MAC address is never used as part of the
   802.16 frame.  Thus, performing the address resolution may be
   redundant in case of IPCS.  For IPv4, blocking ARP needs to be
   implemented by SS itself in an implementation specific fashion not to
   send the unnecessary broadcast (Ethernet) frames over the air.  For
   IPv6, address resolution is the function of IP layer and the IP
   reachability state is maintained through neighbor discovery packets.
   Therefore, blocking neighbor discovery packets would break the
   neighbor unreachability detection model.

   -Router Discovery:

   BS needs to send the RA with separate IP prefix in unicast manner for
   each SS explicitly to send periodic router advertisements in 802.16
   Networks.

   - Prefix Assignment:

   Separate IP prefix should be distributed for each SS to locate them
   on different IP Subnets.  When a SS moves between BSs under the same
   AR, the AR needs to redistribute the same IP Subnet prefix which the
   SS used at the previous BS.

   - Next-Hop:

   SS's next-hop always needs to be the AR which provides the IP
   connectivity at that access network.

   - Neighbor Unreachability Detection (NUD):




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   Because SS always see an AR as the next hop, the NUD is required only
   for that AR.  Also the requirement of NUD may depend on the existence
   of a connection to the BS for that particular destination.

   - Address Autoconfiguration:

   Because a unique prefix is assigned to each SS, the IP Subnet
   consists of only one SS and an AR.  Therefore, duplicate address
   detection (DAD) is trivial.

4.3.  Ethernet like Link model for Ethernet CS: Problems

   - Address Resolution:

   For Ethernet CS, sender needs to perform an address resolution to
   fill the destination Ethernet address field even though that address
   is not used for transmitting an 802.16 frame on the air.  That
   Ethernet destination address is used for a BS or bridge to decide
   where to forward that Ethernet frame after decapsulating the 802.16
   frame.  When the destination's IP address has the same address prefix
   with its own, the sender should set the Ethernet frame's destination
   address as the destination itself.  To acquire that address, the
   address resolution should be performed throughout conventional
   broadcast and multicast based ARP or NDP.  However, if not filtered
   (e.g., [RFC4541]), these multicast and broadcast packets result in
   the problem of waking up the sleep/idle [IEEE802.16e] SSs.

   - Router Discovery:

   All SSs under the AR are located in the same broadcast domain in the
   Ethernet like link model.  In this environment, sending periodic
   Router Advertisements with the destination of all-nodes multicast
   address results in the problem of waking up the sleep/idle
   [IEEE802.16e] SSs.

   - Prefix Assignment:

   Because the same IP prefix is shared with multiple SSs, an IP Subnet
   consists of multiple SSs and an AR.  SS assumes that there exist on-
   link neighbors and tries to resolve the L2 address for the on-link
   prefixes.  However, direct communication using link layer address
   between two SSs is not possible only with Ethernet CS without adding
   bridging functionality on top of BS or between BS and AR.

   - Next-Hop:

   When Ethernet CS is used and the accompanying Ethernet capability
   emulation is implemented, the next-hop for the destination IP with



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   the same global prefix with the sender or link local address type
   should be the destination itself not an AR.

   - Neighbor Unreachability Detection (NUD):

   All SSs under the same AR are all the neighbors.  Therefore, the NUD
   is required for all the SSs and AR.

   - Address Autoconfiguration:

   The duplicate address detection (DAD) should be performed among
   multiple SSs and an AR which are using the same IP prefix.  The
   previous multicast based DAD cause the problem of waking up the
   sleep/idle [IEEE802.16e] SSs.

4.4.  IP over IEEE 802.16 Goals

   The following are the goals in no particular order that point at
   relevant work to be done in IETF.

   Goal #1.  Define the way to provide the point-to-point link model for
   IP CS.

   Goal #2.  Reduce the power consumption caused by waking up sleep/idle
   [IEEE802.16e] terminals for Ethernet like link model.

   Goal #3.  Do not cause multilink subnet problems.

   Goal #4.  Provide the applicability of the previous security works
   like SEND [RFC3971].

   Goal #5.  Do not introduce any new security threats.


5.  IANA Considerations

   This document does not require any actions from IANA.


6.  Security Considerations

   This documents describes the problem statement and goals for IP over
   802.16 networks and does not introduce any new security threats.


7.  Acknowledgment

   The authors would like to express special thank to David Johnston for



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   amending the section 4, "Overview of the IEEE 802.16-2006 MAC layer"
   and carefully reviewing the entire document and also to Phil Roberts
   for suggesting the reorganization of the document depending on the
   baseline IP subnet models.

   The authors also would like to express thank to Jari Arkko, HeeYoung
   Jung, Myung-Ki Shin, Eun-Kyoung Paik, Jaesun Cha and KWISF (Korea
   Wireless Internet Standardization Forum) for their comments and
   contributions.


8.  References

8.1.  Normative References

   [RFC1661]  Simpson, W., "The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)", STD 51,
              RFC 1661, July 1994.

   [RFC3971]  Arkko, J., Kempf, J., Zill, B., and P. Nikander, "SEcure
              Neighbor Discovery (SEND)", RFC 3971, March 2005.

8.2.  Informative References

   [IEEE802.16]
              IEEE Std 802.16-2004, "IEEE Standard for Local and
              metropolitan area networks, Part 16: Air Interface for
              Fixed Broadband Wireless Access Systems", October 2004.

   [IEEE802.16e]
              IEEE Std 802.16e, "IEEE standard for Local and
              metropolitan area networks, Part 16:Air Interface for
              fixed and Mobile broadband wireless access systems",
              October 2005.

   [RFC4541]  Christensen, M., Kimball, K., and F. Solensky,
              "Considerations for Internet Group Management Protocol
              (IGMP) and Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) Snooping
              Switches", RFC 4541, May 2006.

   [RFC4903]  Thaler, D., "Multi-Link Subnet Issues", RFC 4903,
              June 2007.

   [RFC4968]  Madanapalli, S., "Analysis of IPv6 Link Models for 802.16
              Based Networks", RFC 4968, August 2007.







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Authors' Addresses

   Junghoon Jee
   ETRI

   Email: jhjee@etri.re.kr


   Syam Madanapalli
   LogicaCMG

   Email: smadanapalli@gmail.com


   Jeff Mandin
   Runcom

   Email: jeff@streetwaves-networks.com


   gabriel_montenegro_2000@yahoo.com
   Microsoft

   Email: gabriel_montenegro_2000@yahoo.com


   Soohong Daniel Park
   Samsung Electronics

   Email: soohong.park@samsung.com

   Max Riegel
   Nokia Siemens Networks

   Email: maximilian.riegel@nsn.com










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Full Copyright Statement

   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2007).

   This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions
   contained in BCP 78, and except as set forth therein, the authors
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   ietf-ipr@ietf.org.


Acknowledgment

   Funding for the RFC Editor function is provided by the IETF
   Administrative Support Activity (IASA).





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