[Search] [txt|pdf|bibtex] [Tracker] [Email] [Nits]

Versions: 00                                                            
DMM Working Group                                           Jaehwoon Lee
Internet-Draft                                        Dongguk University
Intended status: Informational                              Younghan Kim
Expires: December 7, 2016                            Soongsil University
                                                            June 8, 2016

         Topology-based Distributed Mobility Anchoring in PMIPv6
            draft-jaehwoon-dmm-topology--mobility-anchoring-00

Abstract

   This document presents a topology-based distributed mobility
   management (DMM) mechansim in PMIPv6-based network. In this
   mechanism, a different sub-network prefix is assigned to a different
   access router (AR) in PMIPv6-domain. The sub-network prefix and
   corresponding AR address information is stored in the topology
   server. With this mechanism, there is no need to query mobile
   node (MN)'s localized mobility anchor (LMA) address information
   whenever MN moves from one network to another.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 7, 2016.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.


 Jaehwoon Lee              Expires Dec. 7, 2016                [Page 1]


Internet-Draft  Topology-based mobility anchoring in DMM  June 8, 2016


Table of Contents


   1.  Introduction.................................................2
   2.  Conventions and Terminology..................................2
     2.1.  Conventions used in this document........................2
     2.2.  Terminology  ............................................2
   3.  Protocol Operation...........................................3
   4.  Security Considerations......................................4
   5.  IANA Considerations..........................................4
   6. References....................................................5
   Author's Address.................................................5


1.  Introduction

   Centralized mobility management protocols such as MIPv6 [1] and
   PMIPv6 [2] have several problems such as single-node failure,
   congestion possibility, scalability and non-optimal routes [3]. One
   method to resolve such problems is to use the distributed mobility
   management (DMM) mechanism to distribute mobile agent function to
   access routers (ARs) [4]. Especially, in PMIPv6-based DMM, when a
   mobile node (MN) moves from one network to another, a new AR should
   know (1) whether the MN firstly enters the PMIPv6 domain and (2) the
   address information of the LMA for the MN when the AR knows that the
   MN moves from another network.

   This document presents a topology-based distributed mobility
   management mechanism in PMIMv6 domain. Here, topology server is
   defined to store the topology information containing sub-network
   prefix assigned to different ARs and corresponding AR address
   information. With this mechanism, overhead can be decreased due to
   control message exchange to know the local mobility anchor (LMA) for
   a mobile node (MN) when the MN frequently moves from one network to
   another especially in micro-cell based mobile network environment.


2.  Conventions and Terminology

2.1.  Conventions

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL","SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [5].


2.2 Terminology

   TBD.


 Jaehwoon Lee              Expires Dec. 7, 2016                [Page 2]


Internet-Draft  Topology-based mobility anchoring in DMM  June 8, 2016


3.  Protocol Operation


   Figure 1 show the message exchange procedure to provide topology-
   based DMM in PMIPv6-based network presented in this document.
   A network prefix "PREF" is allocated to the PMIPv6 domain. However,
   a different sub-network prefix belonging toe the same network prefix
   "PREF" is allocated to a different AR in PMIPv6 domain. For example,
   a sub-network prefix "PREF1" belonging to "PREF" is allocated to AR1
   and a different sub-network prefix "PREF2" belonging to the same
   "PREF" is allocated to AR2. Even though a different sub-network
   prefix is allocated to a different AR, all ARs advertise the same
   network prefix "PREF" throught the interfaces providing PMIPv6
   service.

   The sub-network prefix and corresponding AR address mapping
   information is stored in the topology server.



      MN                    AR1             AR2      Topology server  CN
       |                      |              |                 |      |
       |*** L2 attachment ***>|              |                 |      |
       |<----- RA(PREF) ------|              |                 |      |
       |---DHCP request msg-->|              |                 |      |
       |<--DHCP reponse msg---|              |                 |      |
       |    (MN's address)    |              |                 |      |
 (Configure IPv6 address)     |              |                 |      |
       |<-------------------- exchange IP traffic ------------------->|
 (Move from AR1 to AR2)       |              |                 |      |
       |********** L2 attachment ***********>|                 |      |
       |<------------ RA(PREF) --------------|                 |      |
       |------------- IP packet ------------>|                 |      |
       |                      |     (packet buffering)         |      |
       |                      |              |--- query msg -->|      |
       |                      |              |<- response msg -|      |
       |                      | (create BUL and est. tunnel)   |      |
       |                      |         (packet buffering)     |      |
       |                      |<---PBU msg---|                 |      |
       |                      |---PBA msg--->|                 |      |
       |                      |<= IP packet =|                 |      |
       |                      |-------------- IP packet ------------->|

                  Figure 1: Message exchange scenario







 Jaehwoon Lee              Expires Dec. 7, 2016                [Page 3]


Internet-Draft  Topology-based mobility anchoring in DMM  June 8, 2016


   When an MN firstly enters the PMIPv6 domain and connects to an AR
   (say, AR1), AR1 transmits to the MN a Router Advertisement (RA)
   message by setting "M (Managed address configuration)" flag in
   order to configure an address to the MN by using the stateful address
   configuration method [6]. The network prefix "PREF" is set to the
   prefix option information field in the RA message. The MN having
   received the RA message transmits the dynamic host configuration
   protocol (DHCP) request message to the AR1 [7]. The AR1 considers
   that the MN firstly connects to the PMIPv6 domain and transmits the
   DHCP response message containing an address belonging to the "PREF1"
   to th eMN. The MN sets the address contained in the DHCP response
   message to its interface. After that, the MN can communicate to a
   correspondent node (CN) within the Internet.

   When the MN moves from AR1 to AR2 while communicating with a CN, the
   AR1 begins to perform the LMA function for the MN and stores packets
   sent from the CN into the buffer. The AR1 stores the MN's infomation
   into ist Binding Cache Entry (BCE). When the MN connects to AR2, the
   AR2 transmits the RA message containing network prefix set to "PREF"
   to the MN. The MN having received the RA message considers that it
   connects to the same network. It continues to use the address
   configured previously and transmits IP address as usual. AR2 checks
   the first packet transmitted by the MN. If the first packet contains
   the DHCP request packet, AR2 considers that the MN firstly connects
   to the PMIPv6 domain. Otherwise, AR2 considers that the MN moves from
   another AR area and performs the MAG (Mobility Access Gateway)
   function for the MN. AR2 checks its topology table in order to know
   the LMA address for the MN. Sub-network prefix (that is, sub-network
   address and subnet mask) and corresponding LMA address information is
   stored in the topology table. If AR2 finds a cache table entry
   according to the MN, then AR2 establishes the tunnel with the AR1
   (that is, the LMA for the MN) by exchanging the PBU/PBA message
   defined in PMIPv6 protocol. Otherwise, AR2 transmits the topology-
   query message including the MN address information to the topology
   server in order to know the LMA address for the MN. Topology server
   transmits the topology-response message including sub-network prefix
   and corresponding AR address information to the AR2. Then AR2 stores
   the sub-network prefix and AR address information in the topology
   server and establishes the tunnel with the AR1 by exchanging the
   PBU/PBA messages.


4.  Security Considerations

   TBD


5.  IANA Considerations

   TBD

 Jaehwoon Lee              Expires Dec. 7, 2016                [Page 4]


Internet-Draft  Topology-based mobility anchoring in DMM  June 8, 2016


6.  References

   [1]  D. Johnson, C. Perkins and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support in
        IPv6", IETF RFC 3775, June 2004.

   [2]  S. Gundavelli, K. Leung, V. Devarapalli, K. Chowdhury and
        B. Patil, "Proxy Mobile IPv6", IETF RFC 5213, Aug. 2008.

   [3]  H. Chan, D. Liu, P. Seite, H. Yokota and J. Korhonen,
        "Requirements for Distributed Mobility Management",
        draft-ietf-dmm-requirements-03 (work in progress), Dec. 2012.

   [4]  IETF dmm working group,
        http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/dmm/charter.

   [5]  Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
        Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [6]  T. Narten, E. Nordmark, W. Sompson and H. Soliman, "Neighbor
        Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6), IETF RFC 4861, Sep. 2007.

   [7]  R. Droms, J. Bound, B. Volz, T. Lemon, C. Perkins and M. Carney,
        "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6)",
        IETF RFC 3315, July 2003.


Author's Address

   Jaehwoon Lee
   Dongguk University
   26, 3-ga Pil-dong, Chung-gu
   Seoul 100-715, KOREA
   Email: jaehwoon@dongguk.edu

   Younghan Kim
   Soongsil University
   369, Sangdo-ro, Dongjak-gu,
   Seoul 156-743, Korea
   Email: younghak@ssu.ac.kr












 Jaehwoon Lee              Expires Dec. 7, 2016               [Page 5]