[Search] [txt|pdf|bibtex] [Tracker] [Email] [Nits]

Versions: 00                                                            
NFV Research Group                                               S. Jeon
Internet-Draft                             Instituto de Telecomunicacoes
Intended status: Informational                                    Y. Kim
Expires: April 21, 2016                              Soongsil University
                                                        October 19, 2015


  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning in Non-Virtualized Networks
           draft-sijeon-nfvrg-dynamic-resource-vnfaas-00.txt

Abstract

   This draft describes examples of Virtual Network Function as a
   Service (VNFaaS) for dynamic resource provisioning in non-virtualized
   networks, with benefits, while introducing challenges and
   considerations.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 21, 2016.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.



Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 1]


Internet-Draft  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning    October 2015


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Examples of Dynamic Resource Provisioning in Non-Virtualized
       Networks  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     2.1.  Traffic Offloading  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Localized Processing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Challenges and Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Integrated monitoring of VNFs and PNFs  . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.2.  Interfacing between VNFs and PNFs . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.3.  Dependencies verification between the VNFs, VNFs and PNFs   4
   4.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     6.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     6.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   NFV promises reduced time-to-market and rapid deployment of novel
   network solutions by running the network function software instance
   decoupled from a hardware appliance on top of standard high-volume
   servers.  It is also expected to address operator's issues on the
   flexibility.  However, expecting NFV will totally replace the current
   4G equipment in near future would not be realistic, as operators have
   different replacement schedules and evolution strategies of their
   networks.

   The NFV enables various kinds of virtualized services such as NFV
   Infrastructure as a Service (NFVIaaS), Virtual Network Platform as a
   Service (VNPaaS), Virtual Network Function as a Service (VNFaaS), and
   so on [ETSI-NFV-USE-CASES].  VNFaaS could be useful, particularly for
   dynamic resource provisioning in non-virtualized networks, for
   addressing dimensioning-related issues while presenting value-added
   services over the current network deployment, without big burdens of
   CAPEX and OPEX.

   This draft describes examples of VNFaaS for dynamic resource
   provisioning in non-virtualized networks, with benefits, while
   introducing challenges and considerations.

2.  Examples of Dynamic Resource Provisioning in Non-Virtualized
    Networks

   The examples of VNFaaS introduced below focus on dynamic resource
   provisioning with expected benefits and optimization perspectives.




Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 2]


Internet-Draft  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning    October 2015


   The deployed aspects and features can vary and be differently
   customized depending on the demand of operators.

2.1.  Traffic Offloading

   The rapid increase of data traffic over mobile network is giving big
   concerns to operator; how to mitigate/offload the increasing traffic
   while increasing average revenue per user (ARPU).  There are already
   well-known traffic offloading solutions for 3GPP networks, such as
   Local IP Access (LIPA) and Selective IP Traffic Offloading (SIPTO),
   which aims to localize traffic, where the target peer could be
   locally available.  Those approaches require additional hardware
   deployment, such as local gateways (LGWs), where needed over regions,
   or call for significant changes of the deployed network, thus
   increasing CAPEX and OPEX.  They may be useful at peak hours and days
   while the usability is at low in the rest of times.

   Instantiating virtualized EPC (vEPC) with full EPC components could
   be useful; however, selected VNFs in the vEPC for dynamic resource
   provisioning could be utilized on demand, which can effectively
   address the traffic offloading problem faced by the operators.  That
   is, Serving GW (SGW) and PDN GW (PGW) can be served on a regional
   cloud while those are connected and interfaced with the legacy EPC
   (physical EPC, pEPC) components to be controlled by such as PCRF and
   MME in the pEPC.  In addition, it is envisaged that different
   offloading vEPC mode can be programmed to meet more diverse aspects
   of traffic offloading with granularity, as proposed in [vEPC-TOF].

2.2.  Localized Processing

   3GPP Machine-Type Communications (MTC) architecture is dedicated for
   effectively handling machine-to-machine (M2M), which can be
   interchangeably called MTC, traffic over a 3GPP network.
   Characteristics of MTC traffic vary over developed MTC applications.
   Some MTC applications generate lots of signaling traffic including
   the subscription control, which may be huge by taking into
   consideration millions of MTC devices.  For effective processing with
   reduced delay on demand, subscription control function can be
   additionally provided within the Radio Access Network (RAN) in close
   proximity to MTC devices, which aspect could be similar with the
   concept of the ETSI Mobile-Edge Computing (MEC)
   [ETSI-MEC-Whitepaper].  It may enable localized processing of huge
   amounts of MTC signaling traffic that should have gone through the
   MTC core over regional access networks, while contributing to
   reliability of overall MTC system architecture.






Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 3]


Internet-Draft  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning    October 2015


3.  Challenges and Considerations

   We briefly mention challenges for the VNFaaS-based dynamic resource
   provisioning over non-virtualized networks are described with
   consideration in previously submitted IRTF drafts and scientific
   publications.  More aspects regarding those will be updated in next
   version.

3.1.  Integrated monitoring of VNFs and PNFs

   Determination, deployment, and initiation of VNFs can be made by a
   human intervention.  However, to decide proper a dynamic resource
   provisioning strategy in an automated process, it should be able to
   exactly identify the current situation and determine optimal
   placement of the VNFs with resource availability.  Integrated
   monitoring of deployed VNFs and Physical Network Functions (PNFs)
   should be possible.  [ETSI-NFV-MANO] introduces several ways of the
   event monitoring, i.e. VNF-initiated, Element Management (EM)-
   initiated, OSS/BSS-initiated, and VNF Manager (VNFM)-initiated.  One
   easy way to get the event monitoring of the PNFs could be using OSS/
   BSS-initiated.  And the NFV Orchestrator should get properly notified
   from those monitored events.

3.2.  Interfacing between VNFs and PNFs

   It may need to interface between dynamically deployed VNFs and PNFs
   running over a network, where the VNFs cannot work standalone but
   requires interfacing for a control plane operation.  In case of the
   traffic offloading scenario, deployed SGW and PGW should be connected
   with physical MME, and the MME should be able to be aware of newly
   initiated GWs' context information in a running time.

3.3.  Dependencies verification between the VNFs, VNFs and PNFs

   Once VNFs to be instantiated are determined, it should be identified
   availability of the VNFs and cloud resource.  Then, dependencies
   verification should be followed, to identify whether there are
   dependencies issues to be working with other VNFs and PNFs.  The need
   of dependencies of network service components in NFV framework was
   mentioned in [I-D.shin-nfvrg-service-verification], with an example,
   i.e.  case of inconsistency between states stored and managed in VNF
   Forwarding Graphs (FGs), however, not covering the dependencies
   between VNFs and PNFs.

   One idea to avoid such dependencies could come from policy-based
   intent statement that regulates specific actions with constraints
   [I-D.irtf-nfvrg-nfv-policy-arch], which can block undesired actions
   before instantiation and execution of the determined VNFs, however,



Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 4]


Internet-Draft  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning    October 2015


   it may be difficult to check deeper level of dependencies issues made
   over the possibility of diverse combination of different kinds of
   VNFs.

4.  IANA Considerations

5.  Security Considerations

6.  References

6.1.  Normative References

   [I-D.irtf-nfvrg-nfv-policy-arch]
              Figueira, N., Krishnan, R., Lopez, D., Wright, S., and D.
              Krishnaswamy, "Policy Architecture and Framework for NFV
              Infrastructures", draft-irtf-nfvrg-nfv-policy-arch-02
              (work in progress), October 2015.

6.2.  Informative References

   [ETSI-MEC-Whitepaper]
              ETSI, "Mobile-Edge Computing - Introductory Technical
              White Paper", September 2014.

   [ETSI-NFV-MANO]
              ETSI, "Network Function Virtualisation (NFV) Management
              and Orchestration, v1.1.1", December 2014.

   [ETSI-NFV-USE-CASES]
              ETSI, "Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV); Use Cases,
              v1.1.1", October 2013.

   [I-D.shin-nfvrg-service-verification]
              Shin, M., Nam, K., Pack, S., Lee, S., Krishnan, R., and T.
              Kim, "Verification of NFV Services : Problem Statement and
              Challenges", draft-shin-nfvrg-service-verification-04
              (work in progress), October 2015.

   [vEPC-TOF]
              Jeon, S., Corujo, D., and R. Aguiar, "Virtualised EPC for
              On-Demand Mobile Traffic Offloading in 5G Environments",
               Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Standards and
              Communications Networking (CSCN) 2015, October 2015.








Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 5]


Internet-Draft  VNFaaS for Dynamic Resource Provisioning    October 2015


Authors' Addresses

   Seil Jeon
   Instituto de Telecomunicacoes
   Campus Universitario de Santiago
   Aveiro  3810-193
   Portugal

   Email: seiljeon@av.it.pt


   Younghan Kim
   Soongsil University
   369, Sangdo-ro, Dongjak-gu
   Seoul  156-743
   Korea

   Email: younghak@ssu.ac.kr

































Jeon & Kim               Expires April 21, 2016                 [Page 6]