An Architecture for Inter-Domain Policy Routing
RFC 1478

Document Type RFC - Historic (June 1993; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream IETF
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream WG state (None)
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 1478 (Historic)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                     M. Steenstrup
Request for Comments: 1478                 BBN Systems and Technologies
                                                              June 1993

            An Architecture for Inter-Domain Policy Routing

Status of this Memo

   This RFC specifies an IAB standards track protocol for the Internet
   community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements.
   Please refer to the current edition of the "IAB Official Protocol
   Standards" for the standardization state and status of this protocol.
   Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   We present an architecture for inter-domain policy routing (IDPR).
   The objective of IDPR is to construct and maintain routes, between
   source and destination administrative domains, that provide user
   traffic with the requested services within the constraints stipulated
   for the domains transited.  The IDPR architecture is designed to
   accommodate an internetwork containing tens of thousands of
   administrative domains with heterogeneous service requirements and
   restrictions.

Contributors

   The following people have contributed to the IDPR architecture: Bob
   Braden, Lee Breslau, Ross Callon, Noel Chiappa, Dave Clark, Pat
   Clark, Deborah Estrin, Marianne Lepp, Mike Little, Martha Steenstrup,
   Zaw-Sing Su, Paul Tsuchiya, and Gene Tsudik.  Yakov Rekhter supplied
   many useful comments on a previous draft of this document.

Steenstrup                                                      [Page 1]
RFC 1478                   IDPR Architecture                   June 1993

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   1.1. The Internet Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   2. Approaches to Policy Routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   2.1. Policy Route Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   2.1.1. Distance Vector Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   2.1.2. Link State Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   2.2. Routing Information Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   2.2.1. Distance Vector Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   2.2.2. Link State Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
   2.3. Message Forwarding along Policy Routes. . . . . . . . . . . .10
   2.3.1. Hop-by-Hop Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
   2.3.1.1. A Clarification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
   2.3.2. Source Specified Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
   3. The IDPR Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
   3.1. IDPR Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
   3.2. IDPR Entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
   3.2.1. Path Agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
   3.2.2. IDPR Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
   3.2.3. Entity Identifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
   3.3. Security and Reliability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
   3.3.1. Retransmissions and Acknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . . .20
   3.3.2. Integrity Checks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   3.3.3. Source Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   3.3.4. Timestamps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   3.4. An Example of IDPR Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
   4. Accommodating a Large, Heterogeneous Internet . . . . . . . . .25
   4.1. Domain Level Routing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
   4.2. Route Generation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
   4.3. Super Domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
   4.4. Domain Communities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
   4.5. Robustness in the Presence of Failures. . . . . . . . . . . .31
   4.5.1. Path Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
   4.5.2. Partitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
   5. References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XX
   5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
   6. Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Steenstrup                                                      [Page 2]
RFC 1478                   IDPR Architecture                   June 1993

1.  Introduction

   As data communications technologies evolve and user populations grow,
   the demand for internetworking increases.  Internetworks usually
   proliferate through interconnection of autonomous, heterogeneous
   networks administered by separate authorities.  We use the term
   "administrative domain" (AD) to refer to any collection of contiguous
   networks, gateways, links, and hosts governed by a single
   administrative authority who selects the intra-domain routing
   procedures and addressing schemes, specifies service restrictions for
Show full document text