A Tutorial on Gatewaying between X.400 and Internet Mail
RFC 1506

Document Type RFC - Informational (August 1993; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                      J. Houttuin
Request for Comments:  1506                           RARE Secretariat
RARE Technical Report: 6                                   August 1993

        A Tutorial on Gatewaying between X.400 and Internet Mail

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard.  Distribution of this memo is
   unlimited.

Introduction

   There are many ways in which X.400 and Internet (STD 11, RFC 822)
   mail systems can be interconnected. Addresses and service elements
   can be mapped onto each other in different ways. From the early
   available gateway implementations, one was not necessarily better
   than another, but the sole fact that each handled the mappings in a
   different way led to major interworking problems, especially when a
   message (or address) crossed more than one gateway. The need for one
   global standard on how to implement X.400 - Internet mail gatewaying
   was satisfied by the Internet Request For Comments 1327, titled
   "Mapping between X.400(1988)/ISO 10021 and RFC 822."

   This tutorial was produced especially to help new gateway managers
   find their way into the complicated subject of mail gatewaying
   according to RFC 1327. The need for such a tutorial can be
   illustrated by quoting the following discouraging paragraph from RFC
   1327, chapter 1: "Warning: the remainder of this specification is
   technically detailed. It will not make sense, except in the context
   of RFC 822 and X.400 (1988). Do not attempt to read this document
   unless you are familiar with these specifications."

   The introduction of this tutorial is general enough to be read not
   only by gateway managers, but also by e-mail managers who are new to
   gatewaying or to one of the two e-mail worlds in general. Parts of
   this introduction can be skipped as needed.

   For novice end-users, even this tutorial will be difficult to read.
   They are encouraged to use the COSINE MHS pocket user guide [14]
   instead.

   To a certain extent, this document can also be used as a reference
   guide to X.400 <-> RFC 822 gatewaying. Wherever there is a lack of
   detail in the tutorial, it will at least point to the corresponding
   chapters in other documents. As such, it shields the RFC 1327 novice

RARE Working Group on Mail and Messaging (WG-MSG)               [Page 1]
RFC 1506        X.400-Internet Mail Gatewaying Tutorial      August 1993

   from too much detail.

Acknowledgements

   This tutorial is heavily based on other documents, such as [2], [6],
   [7], [8], and [11], from which large parts of text were reproduced
   (slightly edited) by kind permission from the authors.

   The author would like to thank the following persons for their
   thorough reviews: Peter Cowen (Nexor), Urs Eppenberger (SWITCH), Erik
   Huizer (SURFnet), Steve Kille (ISODE Consortium), Paul Klarenberg
   (NetConsult), Felix Kugler (SWITCH), Sabine Luethi.

Disclaimer

   This document is not everywhere exact and/or complete in describing
   the involved standards. Irrelevant details are left out and some
   concepts are simplified for the ease of understanding. For reference
   purposes, always use the original documents.

RARE Working Group on Mail and Messaging (WG-MSG)               [Page 2]
RFC 1506        X.400-Internet Mail Gatewaying Tutorial      August 1993

Table of Contents

       1. An overview of relevant standards ........................   4
         1.1. What is X.400 ? ......................................   5
         1.2. What is an RFC ? .....................................   8
         1.3. What is RFC 822 ? ....................................   9
         1.4. What is RFC 1327 ? ...................................  11
       2. Service Elements .........................................  12
       3. Address mapping ..........................................  14
         3.1. X.400 addresses ......................................  15
           3.1.1. Standard Attributes ..............................  15
           3.1.2. Domain Defined Attributes ........................  17
           3.1.3. X.400 address notation ...........................  17
         3.2. RFC 822 addresses ....................................  19
         3.3. RFC 1327 address mapping .............................  20
           3.3.1. Default mapping ..................................  20
             3.3.1.1. X.400 -> RFC 822 .............................  20
             3.3.1.2. RFC 822 -> X.400 .............................  22
           3.3.2. Exception mapping ................................  23
             3.3.2.1. PersonalName and localpart mapping ...........  25
             3.3.2.2. X.400 domain and domainpart mapping ..........  26
               3.3.2.2.1. X.400 -> RFC 822 .........................  27
               3.3.2.2.2. RFC 822 -> X.400 .........................  28
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