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Host Resources MIB
RFC 1514

Document type: RFC - Proposed Standard (September 1993; No errata)
Obsoleted by RFC 2790
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2013-03-02
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

IETF State: (None)
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: RFC 1514 (Proposed Standard)
Responsible AD: (None)
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Network Working Group                                          P. Grillo
Request for Comments: 1514                           Network Innovations
                                                       Intel Corporation
                                                           S. Waldbusser
                                              Carnegie Mellon University
                                                          September 1993

                           Host Resources MIB

Status of this Memo

   This RFC specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" for the standardization state and status
   of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   This memo defines a MIB for use with managing host systems.  The term
   "host" is construed to mean any computer that communicates with other
   similar computers attached to the internet and that is directly used
   by one or more human beings. Although this MIB does not necessarily
   apply to devices whose primary function is communications services
   (e.g., terminal servers, routers, bridges, monitoring equipment),
   such relevance is not explicitly precluded.  This MIB instruments
   attributes common to all internet hosts including, for example, both
   personal computers and systems that run variants of Unix.

Table of Contents

   1. The Network Management Framework ......................    2
   2. Host Resources MIB ....................................    3
   3. Definitions ...........................................    3
   4.1 Textual Conventions ..................................    3
   4.2 The Host Resources System Group ......................    5
   4.3 The Host Resources Storage Group .....................    6
   4.4 The Host Resources Device Group ......................   10
   4.5 The Host Resources Running Software Group ............   25
   4.6 The Host Resources  Running  Software  Performance
       Group ................................................   27
   4.7 The Host Resources Installed Software Group ..........   29
   5. References ............................................   31
   6. Acknowledgments .......................................   32
   7. Security Considerations ...............................   32
   8. Authors' Addresses ....................................   33

Grillo & Waldbusser                                             [Page 1]
RFC 1514                   Host Resources MIB             September 1993

1.  The Network Management Framework

   The Internet-standard Network Management Framework consists of three
   components.  They are:

      STD 16, RFC 1155 [1] which defines the SMI, the mechanisms used
      for describing and naming objects for the purpose of management.
      STD 16, RFC 1212 [2] defines a more concise description mechanism,
      which is wholly consistent with the SMI.

      STD 17, RFC 1213 [3] which defines MIB-II, the core set of managed
      objects for the Internet suite of protocols.

      STD 15, RFC 1157 [4] which defines the SNMP, the protocol used for
      network access to managed objects.

   The Framework permits new objects to be defined for the purpose of
   experimentation and evaluation.

   Managed objects are accessed via a virtual information store, termed
   the Management Information Base or MIB.  Within a given MIB module,
   objects are defined using STD 16, RFC 1212's OBJECT-TYPE macro.  At a
   minimum, each object has a name, a syntax, an access-level, and an
   implementation-status.

   The name is an object identifier, an administratively assigned name,
   which specifies an object type.  The object type together with an
   object instance serves to uniquely identify a specific instantiation
   of the object.  For human convenience, we often use a textual string,
   termed the object descriptor, to also refer to the object type.

   The syntax of an object type defines the abstract data structure
   corresponding to that object type.  The ASN.1[5] language is used for
   this purpose.  However, RFC 1155 purposely restricts the ASN.1
   constructs which may be used.  These restrictions are explicitly made
   for simplicity.

   The access-level of an object type defines whether it makes "protocol
   sense" to read and/or write the value of an instance of the object
   type.  (This access-level is independent of any administrative
   authorization policy.)

   The implementation-status of an object type indicates whether the
   object is mandatory, optional, obsolete, or deprecated.

Grillo & Waldbusser                                             [Page 2]

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