Next Steps for the IP QoS Architecture
RFC 2990

 
Document Type RFC - Informational (November 2000; No errata)
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Network Working Group                                         G. Huston
Request for Comments: 2990                                      Telstra
Category: Informational                                   November 2000

                Next Steps for the IP QoS Architecture

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2000).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   While there has been significant progress in the definition of
   Quality of Service (QoS) architectures for internet networks, there
   are a number of aspects of QoS that appear to need further
   elaboration as they relate to translating a set of tools into a
   coherent platform for end-to-end service delivery.  This document
   highlights the outstanding architectural issues relating to the
   deployment and use of QoS mechanisms within internet networks, noting
   those areas where further standards work may assist with the
   deployment of QoS internets.

   This document is the outcome of a collaborative exercise on the part
   of the Internet Architecture Board.

Table of Contents

    1. Introduction ...........................................   2
    2. State and Stateless QoS ................................   4
    3. Next Steps for QoS Architectures .......................   6
       3.1 QoS-Enabled Applications ...........................   7
       3.2 The Service Environment ............................   9
       3.3 QoS Discovery ......................................  10
       3.4 QoS Routing and Resource Management ................  10
       3.5 TCP and QoS ........................................  11
       3.6 Per-Flow States and Per-Packet classifiers .........  13
       3.7 The Service Set ....................................  14
       3.8 Measuring Service Delivery .........................  14
       3.9 QoS Accounting .....................................  15
       3.10 QoS Deployment Diversity ..........................  16
       3.11 QoS Inter-Domain signaling ........................  17

Huston                       Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 2990            Next Steps for QoS Architecture        November 2000

       3.12 QoS Deployment Logistics ..........................  17
    4. The objective of the QoS architecture ..................  18
    5. Towards an end-to-end QoS architecture .................  19
    6. Conclusions ............................................  21
    7. Security Considerations ................................  21
    8. References .............................................  22
    9. Acknowledgments ........................................  23
   10. Author's Address .......................................  23
   11. Full Copyright Statement ...............................  24

1. Introduction

   The default service offering associated with the Internet is
   characterized as a best-effort variable service response.  Within
   this service profile the network makes no attempt to actively
   differentiate its service response between the traffic streams
   generated by concurrent users of the network.  As the load generated
   by the active traffic flows within the network varies, the network's
   best effort service response will also vary.

   The objective of various Internet Quality of Service (QoS) efforts is
   to augment this base service with a number of selectable service
   responses.  These service responses may be distinguished from the
   best-effort service by some form of superior service level, or they
   may be distinguished by providing a predictable service response
   which is unaffected by external conditions such as the number of
   concurrent traffic flows, or their generated traffic load.

   Any network service response is an outcome of the resources available
   to service a load, and the level of the load itself.  To offer such
   distinguished services there is not only a requirement to provide a
   differentiated service response within the network, there is also a
   requirement to control the service-qualified load admitted into the
   network, so that the resources allocated by the network to support a
   particular service response are capable of providing that response
   for the imposed load.  This combination of admission control agents
   and service management elements can be summarized as "rules plus
   behaviors". To use the terminology of the Differentiated Service
   architecture [4], this admission control function is undertaken by a
   traffic conditioner (an entity which performs traffic conditioning
   functions and which may contain meters, markers, droppers, and
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