How to Advertise Responsibly Using E-Mail and Newsgroups or - how NOT to $$$$$ MAKE ENEMIES FAST! $$$$$
RFC 3098

Document Type RFC - Informational (April 2001; No errata)
Also known as FYI 38
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream IETF
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream WG state (None)
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 3098 (Informational)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                           T. Gavin
Request for Comments: 3098                       Nachman Hays Consulting
FYI: 38                                                  D. Eastlake 3rd
Category: Informational                                         Motorola
                                                            S. Hambridge
                                                                   Intel
                                                              April 2001

        How to Advertise Responsibly Using E-Mail and Newsgroups
                            or - how NOT to
                    $$$$$  MAKE ENEMIES FAST!  $$$$$

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2001).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This memo offers useful suggestions for responsible advertising
   techniques that can be used via the internet in an environment where
   the advertiser, recipients, and the Internet Community can coexist in
   a productive and mutually respectful fashion.  Some measure of
   clarity will also be added to the definitions, dangers, and details
   inherent to Internet Marketing.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction ..............................................  2
   2.  Image and Perception of the Advertiser.....................  4
   3.  Collateral Damage .........................................  5
   4.  Caveat Mercator ...........................................  5
   5.  Targeting the Audience ....................................  7
   6.  Reaching the audience .....................................  8
       A.   Dedicated website or web page ........................  8
       B.   "Shared" Advertising website .........................  9
       C.   Netnews and E-Mailing list group postings ............ 10
       D.   Compiled E-Mail Lists ................................ 11
   7.  Opt-In Mailing Lists ...................................... 12
       A. Privacy ................................................ 13
       B. Integrity .............................................. 13
       C. Protection ............................................. 16

Gavin, et al.                Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 3098                Advertising Responsibly               April 2001

   8.  Irresponsible Behavior .................................... 16
   9.  Responsible Behavior ...................................... 17
   10. Security Considerations ................................... 19
   Appendices .................................................... 20
     A.1  The classic Pyramid .................................... 20
     A.2  What about Ponzi? ...................................... 22
     A.3  So all multi-levels are evil? .......................... 22
     B.1  Why Web Privacy? ....................................... 23
   References .................................................... 25
   Authors' Addresses ............................................ 26
   Acknowledgments and Significant Contributors .................  27
   Full Copyright Statement ...................................... 28

1. Introduction

   The Internet is not a free resource.  Access to and a presence on the
   'Net comes at a cost to the participants, the service provider, and
   the recipients of those services made available by the Internet.  The
   more readily available internet has allowed users access to an
   unprecedented number of people.  Due to the rapid growth and
   "mainstream" acceptance of the 'Net, new opportunities have been
   found for the distribution of information to the vast and ever-
   growing community of Internet users.  There are groups and
   individuals who choose to use the 'Net for purposes for which it was
   not intended, thus defying the consensus among both the practitioners
   and the unwilling recipients.  The aforementioned practice, of
   course, is the sending of Unsolicited Commercial and Bulk E-Mail
   messages, posts to Netnews groups, or other unsolicited electronic
   communication.  This condition has caused an awakening on the part of
   the Internet community-at-large.

   There are stereotypes that must be broken before continuing.  Not all
   persons who are new to the Internet are ignorant of the 'Net's
   history and evolution, or its proper and ethical uses.  Nor are all
   experienced, long-term Netizens against the use of the Internet for
   advertising, marketing, or other business purposes.  Where these two
   groups can find commonality is in their opposition to the use of the
   Internet in irresponsible ways.  Some of these irresponsible uses
   include, but are not limited to, the sending of Unsolicited Bulk or
   Commercial E-Mail to mailing lists, individuals, or netnews groups.
   In the vernacular, this activity is called "spamming" (the sending of
Show full document text