Overview of IP Multicast in a Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Environment
RFC 3353

Document Type RFC - Informational (August 2002; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream IETF
Formats plain text pdf html
Stream WG state WG Document
Consensus Unknown
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 3353 (Informational)
Telechat date
Responsible AD Scott Bradner
IESG note Responsible: RFC Editor
Send notices to <swallow@cisco.com>, <loa@pi.se>
Network Working Group                                            D. Ooms
Request for Comments: 3353                                       Alcatel
Category: Informational                                         B. Sales
                                                                 Alcatel
                                                               W. Livens
                                                            Colt Telecom
                                                              A. Acharya
                                                                     IBM
                                                             F. Griffoul
                                                                 Ulticom
                                                               F. Ansari
                                                               Bell Labs
                                                             August 2002

                     Overview of IP Multicast in a
           Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Environment

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2002).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document offers a framework for IP multicast deployment in an
   MPLS environment.  Issues arising when MPLS techniques are applied to
   IP multicast are overviewed.  The pros and cons of existing IP
   multicast routing protocols in the context of MPLS are described and
   the relation to the different trigger methods and label distribution
   modes are discussed.  The consequences of various layer 2 (L2)
   technologies are listed.  Both point-to-point and multi-access
   networks are considered.

Ooms, et al.                 Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 3353          IP Multicast in an MPLS Environment        August 2002

Table of Contents

   1.     Introduction .............................................  3
   2.     Layer 2 Characteristics ..................................  4
   3.     Taxonomy of IP Multicast Routing Protocols
          in the Context of MPLS ...................................  5
   3.1.   Aggregation ..............................................  5
   3.2.   Flood & Prune ............................................  5
   3.3.   Source/Shared Trees ......................................  6
   3.4.   Co-existence of Source and Shared Trees ..................  7
   3.5.   Uni/Bi-directional Shared Trees .......................... 10
   3.6.   Encapsulated Multicast Data .............................. 11
   3.7.   Loop-free-ness ........................................... 11
   3.8.   Mapping of Characteristics on Existing Protocols ......... 11
   4.     Mixed L2/L3 Forwarding in a Single Node .................. 12
   5.     Taxonomy of IP Multicast LSP Triggers .................... 14
   5.1.   Request Driven ........................................... 14
   5.1.1. General .................................................. 14
   5.1.2. Multicast Routing Messages ............................... 15
   5.1.3. Resource Reservation Messages ............................ 15
   5.2.   Topology Driven .......................................... 16
   5.3.   Traffic Driven ........................................... 16
   5.3.1. General .................................................. 16
   5.3.2. An Implementation Example ................................ 17
   5.4.   Combinations of Triggers and Label Distribution Modes .... 18
   6.     Piggy-backing ............................................ 18
   7.     Explicit Routing ......................................... 20
   8.     QoS/CoS .................................................. 20
   8.1.   DiffServ ................................................. 20
   8.2.   IntServ and RSVP ......................................... 21
   9.     Multi-access Networks .................................... 21
   10.    More Issues .............................................. 22
   10.1.  TTL Field ................................................ 22
   10.2.  Independent vs. Ordered Label Distribution Control ....... 23
   10.3.  Conservative vs. Liberal Label Retention Mode ............ 24
   10.4.  Downstream vs. Upstream Label Allocation ................. 25
   10.5.  Explicit vs. Implicit Label Distribution ................. 25
   11.    Security Considerations .................................. 26
   12.    Acknowledgements ......................................... 26
   Informative References........................................... 27
   Authors' Addresses .............................................. 28
   Full Copyright Statement ........................................ 30
Show full document text