Architecture Taxonomy for Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points (CAPWAP)
RFC 4118

 
Document Type RFC - Informational (June 2005; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream IETF
Formats plain text pdf html
Stream WG state (None)
Consensus Unknown
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 4118 (Informational)
Telechat date
Responsible AD Bert Wijnen
Send notices to mmani@avaya.com, dorothy.gellert@nokia.com, lily.l.yang@intel.com

Email authors IPR References Referenced by Nits Search lists

Network Working Group                                            L. Yang
Request for Comments: 4118                                   Intel Corp.
Category: Informational                                        P. Zerfos
                                                                    UCLA
                                                                E. Sadot
                                                                   Avaya
                                                               June 2005

                       Architecture Taxonomy for
      Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points (CAPWAP)

Status of This Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   This document provides a taxonomy of the architectures employed in
   the existing IEEE 802.11 products in the market, by analyzing
   Wireless LAN (WLAN) functions and services and describing the
   different variants in distributing these functions and services among
   the architectural entities.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
       1.1.  IEEE 802.11 WLAN Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
       1.2.  CAPWAP Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       1.3.  WLAN Architecture Proliferation  . . . . . . . . . . .   6
       1.4.  Taxonomy Methodology and Document Organization . . . .   8
   2.  Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   3.  Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
       3.1.  IEEE 802.11 Definitions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
       3.2.  Terminology Used in This Document  . . . . . . . . . .  11
       3.3.  Terminology Used Historically but Not Recommended  . .  13
   4.  Autonomous Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
       4.1.  Overview  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  13
       4.2.  Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   5.  Centralized WLAN Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
       5.1.  Interconnection between WTPs and ACs . . . . . . . . .  16

Yang, et al.                 Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 4118              CAPWAP Architecture Taxonomy             June 2005

       5.2.  Overview of Three Centralized WLAN Architecture
             Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
       5.3.  Local MAC  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19
       5.4.  Split MAC  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22
       5.5.  Remote MAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  27
       5.6.  Comparisons of Local MAC, Split MAC, and Remote MAC. .  27
       5.7.  Communication Interface between WTPs and ACs . . . . .  29
       5.8.  Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29
             5.8.1.  Client Data Security . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
             5.8.2.  Security of Control Channel between
                     the WTP and AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  30
             5.8.3.  Physical Security of WTPs and ACs  . . . . . .  31
   6.  Distributed Mesh Architecture  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
       6.1.  Common Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  32
       6.2.  Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   7.  Summary and Conclusions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  33
   8.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  36
   9.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  37
   10. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  39

1.  Introduction

   As IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN (WLAN) technology matures, large scale
   deployment of WLAN networks is highlighting certain technical
   challenges.  As outlined in [2], management, monitoring, and control
   of large number of Access Points (APs) in the network may prove to be
   a significant burden for network administration.  Distributing and
   maintaining a consistent configuration throughout the entire set of
   APs in the WLAN is a difficult task.  The shared and dynamic nature
   of the wireless medium also demands effective coordination among the
   APs to minimize radio interference and maximize network performance.
   Network security issues, which have always been a concern in WLANs,
   present even more challenges in large deployments and new
   architectures.

   Recently many vendors have begun offering partially proprietary
   solutions to address some or all of the above mentioned problems.
   Since interoperable systems allow for a broader choice of solutions,
   a standardized interoperable solution addressing the aforementioned
Show full document text