Hierarchical IPv4 Framework
RFC 6306

Document Type RFC - Experimental (July 2011; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream IRTF
Formats plain text pdf html
Stream IRTF state (None)
Consensus Unknown
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 6306 (Experimental)
Telechat date
Responsible AD Ralph Droms
IESG note IRSG submission. Tony Li (tony.li@tony.li) is the document shepherd.
Send notices to pfrejborg@gmail.com, draft-frejborg-hipv4@ietf.org, tony.li@tony.li
Internet Research Task Force (IRTF)                          P. Frejborg
Request for Comments: 6306                                     July 2011
Category: Experimental
ISSN: 2070-1721

                      Hierarchical IPv4 Framework

Abstract

   This document describes a framework for how the current IPv4 address
   space can be divided into two new address categories: a core address
   space (Area Locators, ALOCs) that is globally unique, and an edge
   address space (Endpoint Locators, ELOCs) that is regionally unique.
   In the future, the ELOC space will only be significant in a private
   network or in a service provider domain.  Therefore, a 32x32 bit
   addressing scheme and a hierarchical routing architecture are
   achieved.  The hierarchical IPv4 framework is backwards compatible
   with the current IPv4 Internet.

   This document also discusses a method for decoupling the location and
   identifier functions -- future applications can make use of the
   separation.  The framework requires extensions to the existing Domain
   Name System (DNS), the existing IPv4 stack of the endpoints,
   middleboxes, and routers in the Internet.  The framework can be
   implemented incrementally for endpoints, DNS, middleboxes, and
   routers.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for examination, experimental implementation, and
   evaluation.

   This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet
   community.  This document is a product of the Internet Research Task
   Force (IRTF).  The IRTF publishes the results of Internet-related
   research and development activities.  These results might not be
   suitable for deployment.  This RFC represents the individual
   opinion(s) of one or more members of the Routing Research Group of
   the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF).  Documents approved for
   publication by the IRSG are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6306.

Frejborg                      Experimental                      [Page 1]
RFC 6306               Hierarchical IPv4 Framework             July 2011

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2011 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Frejborg                      Experimental                      [Page 2]
RFC 6306               Hierarchical IPv4 Framework             July 2011

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................4
   2. Requirements Notation ...........................................7
   3. Definitions of Terms ............................................7
   4. Hierarchical Addressing .........................................9
   5. Intermediate Routing Architecture ..............................11
      5.1. Overview ..................................................11
      5.2. Life of a hIPv4 Session ...................................15
   6. Long-Term Routing Architecture .................................18
      6.1. Overview ..................................................19
      6.2. Exit, DFZ, and Approach Routing ...........................21
   7. Decoupling Location and Identification .........................23
   8. ALOC Use Cases .................................................24
   9. Mandatory Extensions ...........................................28
      9.1. Overview ..................................................28
      9.2. DNS Extensions ............................................29
      9.3. Extensions to the IPv4 Header .............................30
   10. Consequences ..................................................34
      10.1. Overlapping Local and Remote ELOC Prefixes/Ports .........34
      10.2. Large Encapsulated Packets ...............................35
      10.3. Affected Applications ....................................35
      10.4. ICMP .....................................................37
      10.5. Multicast ................................................37
   11. Traffic Engineering Considerations ............................38
      11.1. Valiant Load-Balancing ...................................39
   12. Mobility Considerations .......................................40
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