Problems with Session Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN) Long-Term Authentication for Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN)
RFC 7376

Document Type RFC - Informational (September 2014; No errata)
Last updated 2015-10-14
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Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)                          T. Reddy
Request for Comments: 7376                               R. Ravindranath
Category: Informational                                            Cisco
ISSN: 2070-1721                                               M. Perumal
                                                                Ericsson
                                                                A. Yegin
                                                                 Samsung
                                                          September 2014

        Problems with Session Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN)
 Long-Term Authentication for Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN)

Abstract

   This document discusses some of the security problems and practical
   problems with the current Session Traversal Utilities for NAT (STUN)
   authentication for Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN) messages.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for informational purposes.

   This document is a product of the Internet Engineering Task Force
   (IETF).  It represents the consensus of the IETF community.  It has
   received public review and has been approved for publication by the
   Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG).  Not all documents
   approved by the IESG are a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7376.

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RFC 7376         STUN Authentication for TURN: Problems   September 2014

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Notational Conventions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Problems with STUN Long-Term Authentication for TURN  . . . .   4
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     6.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     6.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   Traversal Using Relays around NAT (TURN) [RFC5766] is a protocol that
   is often used to improve the connectivity of Peer-to-Peer (P2P)
   applications (as defined in Section 2.7 of [RFC5128]).  TURN allows a
   connection to be established when one or both sides are incapable of
   a direct P2P connection.  The TURN server is also a building block to
   support interactive, real-time communication using audio, video,
   collaboration, games, etc., between two peer web browsers using the
   Web Real-Time Communication (WebRTC) [WebRTC-Overview] framework.

   A TURN server is also used in the following scenarios:

   o  For privacy, users of WebRTC-based web applications may use a TURN
      server to hide host candidate addresses from the remote peer.

   o  Enterprise networks deploy firewalls that typically block UDP
      traffic.  When SIP user agents or WebRTC endpoints are deployed
      behind such firewalls, media cannot be sent over UDP across the
      firewall but must instead be sent using TCP (which causes a

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RFC 7376         STUN Authentication for TURN: Problems   September 2014

      different user experience).  In such cases, a TURN server deployed
      in the DeMilitarized Zone (DMZ) might be used to traverse
      firewalls.

   o  The use case explained in Section 3.3.5 of [WebRTC-Use-Cases]
      ("Simple Video Communication Service, enterprise aspects") refers
      to deploying a TURN server in the DMZ to audit all media sessions
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