Assigning Digital Object Identifiers to RFCs
RFC 7669

Document Type RFC - Informational (October 2015; No errata)
Last updated 2015-10-23
Replaces draft-levine-doi
Stream IAB
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream IAB state Published RFC
Consensus Boilerplate Yes
RFC Editor Note (None)
Internet Architecture Board (IAB)                              J. Levine
Request for Comments: 7669                          Taughannock Networks
Category: Informational                                     October 2015
ISSN: 2070-1721

              Assigning Digital Object Identifiers to RFCs

Abstract

   This document describes the way that Digital Object Identifiers
   (DOIs) are assigned to past and future RFCs.  The DOI is a widely
   used system that assigns unique identifiers to digital documents that
   can be queried and managed in a consistent fashion.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for informational purposes.

   This document is a product of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB)
   and represents information that the IAB has deemed valuable to
   provide for permanent record.  It represents the consensus of the
   Internet Architecture Board (IAB).  Documents approved for
   publication by the IAB are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7669.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2015 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Levine                        Informational                     [Page 1]
RFC 7669                      DOIs for RFCs                 October 2015

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Structure and Resolution of DOIs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  DOIs for RFCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  The Process of Assigning DOIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  Getting a DOI Prefix  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.2.  Retroactively Assigning DOIs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.3.  Assigning DOIs to New RFCs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.4.  Use of DOIs in RFCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.5.  Possible Future Work  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Internationalization  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   IAB Members at the Time of Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   The Digital Object Identifier (DOI) system assigns unique identifiers
   to digital documents that can be queried and managed in a consistent
   fashion.  The structure of DOIs is defined by ISO 26324:2012
   [ISO-DOI] and is implemented by a group of registration agencies
   coordinated by the International DOI Foundation.

   Each DOI is associated with bibliographic metadata about the object,
   including one or more URIs where the object can be found.  The
   metadata is stored in a public database with entries retrieved via
   HTTP.

   DOIs are widely used by publishers and consumers of technical
   journals and other technical material published online.

   Page 15 of [CITABILITY] indicates that (note that citations have been
   omitted):

      Typical web addresses are unreliable for locating online
      resources, because they can move, change or disappear entirely.
      But persistent identifiers are fixed, with an infrastructure that
      allows for the location of the item to be updated.  The result is
      that the identifier can provide persistent access to the data.
      DataCite provides such a service, and DOIs (used by DataCite) were
      by far the identifier most commonly mentioned by interviewees,
      closely followed by Handles (on which the DOI system is built).
      There was a keen preference for DOIs from interviewees because
      this is a system already used and understood by publishers for
      traditional publications and so the barrier to uptake would
      presumably be lower than for an entirely novel system.

Levine                        Informational                     [Page 2]
RFC 7669                      DOIs for RFCs                 October 2015

   Some scholarly publishers accept DOIs as references in published
   documents, and some versions of BibTeX can automatically retrieve the
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