NomCom 2013 (Concluded)

Desired expertise

These pages contain the current summaries of desired expertise for open positions, provided to the Nomcom by the IESG, IAB, and IAOC. As the Nomcom proceeds, per BCP 10, we receive input from the community on the qualifications required for the positions. The Nomcom bases selections on all of this information. These pages may be updated periodically.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Applications AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP 10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the Nomcom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Applications AD

The Applications Area has historically focused on three clusters of protocols. The first cluster contains application protocols that have been ubiquitous for some time, but these protocols continue to develop (e.g., email, HTTP, FTP). The second cluster contains protocols that are used for Internet infrastructure (e.g., IDNA and EPP). The third cluster contains "building block" protocols that are designed to be used in a variety of more specific applications (e.g., LDAP, MIME types, URI schemes, URNs, language tags). Current WGs include topics such as email updates and anti-abuse mechanisms, internationalization, web foundations and security, JSON data format, simple resource manipulation mechanisms for devices in constrained networks, an updated WHOIS protocol, and a protocol to access radio spectrum databases.

The Applications Area often discusses whether something is properly the realm of the IETF or "belongs" to other SDOs. As a result, an Applications AD needs to be willing and able to relate to a wide range of non-IETF organizations, such as the W3C and Unicode Consortium. The Applications Area often re-uses technology developed elsewhere. An Applications AD is also trusted to make critical decisions about the scope of the IETF's applications protocol work.

Because of the breadth of the Applications Area, an Application AD needs to deal with a large set of application protocols, including many with which he or she may not have direct experience. An Applications AD needs to be good at evaluating new approaches to new problems and assessing the expertise of the people who bring them to the IETF.

The set of people in the Applications Area changes with the protocols under development at the time. Therefore it is important that an Applications AD be able to clearly explain how the IETF works and can help new WGs work well within the IETF standards process. The ability to reach out to new technology communities is also important so that the Applications Area stays relevant to the ongoing evolution of Internet applications.

The Applications Area most often intersects with, and sometimes swaps WGs or work items with, the Security Area, the RAI Area, and the Transport Area. In addition, WGs in other areas often re-use technologies that were developed or formalized in the Applications Area (e.g., URIs, MIME, JSON, and XML). Therefore cross-area expertise in any of these areas would be particularly useful.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Transport AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Transport AD

The Transport Area Directors are more than managers, but the “soft skills” included under “Generic Expertise” for all IESG positions matters even more in TSV, because of the breadth of topics the area is responsible for.

There are a number of points that matter for the Transport Area Director position, in addition to the “Generic Expertise”.

The Transport Area works on mechanisms related to end-to-end data transport as well as technologies for network storage, content distribution networks, and peer-to-peer applications. Many transport protocols support Internet applications and services that exchange potentially large volumes of traffic at potentially high bandwidths.

A Transport AD should have a broad understanding of core end-to-end transport topics such as congestion, control loops and hysteresis, flow control, queuing and latency, transport connection and reliability issues, and interactions with the network layer, the application layer, and middleboxes. Transport ADs are not expected to be experts on all or even most of these topics, but rather to work well with the Transport Area participants who are, and to have enough familiarity with the principles involved to exercise their own good judgment about what should be done and why.

A Transport AD should have good relationships with the topic experts in the Transport area, including members of the Transport Area Directorate and RSVP Directorate, and with topic experts in other areas, and this requires good soft skills, including the ability to maintain these directorates.

Together, the two Transport ADs are expected to understand how transport technologies (layer 4) interact with IP layer technologies and protocols (layer 3) technologies, and with the end-to-end aspects of various applications and application-layer protocols (layer 7).

Together, the two Transport ADs are expected to effectively charter, manage and review current and new transport work, including congestion signaling and reporting, QoS and reservation signaling, DiffServ and congestion control for unresponsive flows, NAT regularization and specification, storage protocols for the Internet, peer-to-peer streaming, performance metrics for Internet paths, experimentation with congestion control schemes developed in the IRTF, unicast and multipath extensions to existing transport protocols, and congestion control algorithms for interactive real time media.

The Transport Area intersects most frequently with Internet Area, the Applications Area, the RAI Area, the Security Area, and Transport-related IRTF research groups, especially ICCRG. Cross-area experience in any of those Areas would be particularly useful.

Because many Transport working groups have strong ties to the research community, some research background can be very helpful.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Internet AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Internet AD

The primary technical topics covered by the Internet Area include: IP layer (both IPv4 and IPv6), implications of IPv4 address depletion, co-existence between the IP versions, DNS, DHCP, mobility, multihoming, multicast, host and router configuration, time protocols, and identifier-locator separation, Internet of Things, along with various link-layer technologies. The Internet Area is responsible for specifying how IP will run over new link layer protocols as they are defined.

Between them, the Internet ADs are expected to have a solid understanding of these technologies, including issues related to IP addressing, forwarding, tunneling, and fragmentation.

Since the Internet Area includes a broad range of technical topics, the Internet Area ADs typically divide the WGs that they manage based on workload and expertise. To assist the ADs, there are active DNS and IP directorates. However, with the large number of WGs and high rate of BOF proposals, the Internet Area has historically required considerable time commitment and breadth of expertise from its ADs.

The Internet Area intersects most frequently with the Transport, Routing, Operations and Management, and Security Areas. Interaction with the Transport Area is related to work on address translation, IPv4-IPv6 co-existence, and multihoming mechanisms. Interaction with the Routing Area concentrates mainly on the relationship between the operation of the IP layer and routing functionality. Interaction with the Operations and Management Area is focused on operations required for IPv6 adoption, MIB development, and AAA interactions. Interaction with the Security Area is focused on topics such as IPsec usage, DNS security, and network access control. Cross-area expertise in any of these Areas is particularly useful. The Internet Area is also often involved in the adaptation of a variety of technologies to IP, some of which may require interactions with other organizations such as the ITU, IEEE, BBF, and CableLabs. Expertise with liaison processes and an understanding of how Internet Area protocols are used in various networks (including Broadband, wireless & cellular networks, low-power networks, and the "Internet of Things"), and so on is desirable.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Security AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Security AD

The Security Area primarily focuses on protocols that provide one or more security services: integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and access control, and on protocols that provide infrastructure that supports such security services. Since many security mechanisms needed to provide these security services employ cryptography, key management is also vital. Privacy and usability issues are becoming more important, so an appreciation of the potential privacy and usability impacts of IETF protocols is useful for a Security AD.

Specific expertise required for a Security AD includes a strong knowledge of IETF security protocols and a good working knowledge of security protocols and mechanisms that have been developed in the Security Area, other Areas of the IETF, and outside the IETF. It is also important for Security ADs to understand broader aspects of network and Internet security as well as the practical issues in securing Internet resources, such as techniques for denial-of-service mitigation or Web application-level attacks.

Security ADs must match the cost of security to the value of the resources being protected, and they must balance security against usability. Between the two Security ADs there will ideally be one who is knowledgeable about each of the following security protocols: PKIX, IPsec, TLS, SASL, Kerberos, GSS-API, EAP, CMS, and S/MIME.

The Security Area intersects with all other IETF Areas, and the Security ADs are expected to read and understand the security implications of documents produced by all IETF Areas. Security ADs become personally involved and coordinate the involvement of other security experts in the work of other Areas. Broad knowledge of IETF technologies and the ability to assimilate new information quickly are imperative for a Security AD.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Operations and Management AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Operations and Management AD

The primary technical areas covered by the Operations and Management Area include: Network Management, AAA, and various operational issues facing the Internet such as DNS operations, IPv6 operations, and Routing operations.

Unlike most IETF areas, the Operations and Management Area is logically divided into two separate functions: Network Management and Operations. This year, the Network Management AD role is open, so specific expertise desired for the open position includes a strong understanding of Network Management, measurement, energy management, as well as the ability to step into Internet operations issues when necessary. Specific expertise desired for this position includes a strong understanding of AAA, RADIUS, Diameter, IPFIX, NETCONF, SNMP, SMI, and YANG. A strong architectural background is desirable since the evolution of the Internet management architecture is expected to be one of the principal subjects of interest and work for the Operations and Management Area in the coming years.

Another important role of the Management AD is to identify potential or actual management issues regarding IETF protocols and documents in all Areas, and to work with the other Areas to resolve those issues. This implies a strong understanding of how new and updated protocols should be managed, including aspects related to configuration, monitoring and alarms. It also implies a good understanding of the operational environment, a strong cross-area understanding of the Internet architecture, and a strong understanding of IETF protocols. Note that breadth of technical ability is more important than specific technical expertise.

The Management portion of the Operations and Management Area intersects with all Areas, specifically in reviewing and assisting with documents related to management or AAA aspects, especially documents defining MIB and YANG modules and specifications that make use of RADIUS or Diameter. Thus, cross-area expertise in any Area would be useful. Security of network management is an important topic. The Operations and Management Area also interacts with the operations community, operator organizations like NANOG, RIPE, and other SDOs doing work in network management such as the IEEE 802.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Real-time Applications and Infrastructure AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Real-time Applications and Infrastructure AD

The Real-Time Applications and Infrastructure (RAI) Area develops protocols and architectures for delay-sensitive interpersonal communications. The RAI Area serves an industry whose applications and services include voice and video over IP, instant messaging, and presence. These applications and services are "real-time" in the sense described in RFC 3550.

The infrastructure applications needed to support real-time interpersonal communication are also part of the RAI Area, as are discussions of operational concerns specific to these protocols. For example, work might relate to presence services, to session signaling protocols and emergency call routing solutions, or to work on the "layer five" issues for Internet telephony.

Historically, RAI ADs have spent approximately 75-100% of their time on IETF-related activities.

Like all Areas of the IETF, the RAI Area draws on the work of numerous other Areas, and as such there cannot be knife edge boundaries delineating the work in the RAI Area from the rest of the IETF.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IESG members in general and for the Routing AD position

This note describes the expertise desired in the candidates selected to fill the positions of the IESG members whose terms will expire during the first IETF Meeting in 2014.

Under the Nominations Committee (Nomcom) procedures defined in RFC 3777/BCP10, the IESG is responsible for providing a summary of the expertise desired of the candidates selected for open IESG positions. This information is included below, and is suitable for publication to the community with the NomCom request for nominations.

We realize that this is a long list of desires, and that no one person will be able meet all of the expertise for a specific position. We trust that the Nomcom will weigh all of these qualities and choose IESG members who represent the best possible balance of them.

GENERIC IESG MEMBER EXPERTISE

IESG members are the managers of the IETF standards process. They must understand the way the IETF works, be good at working with other people, be able to inspire and encourage other people to work together as volunteers, and have sound technical judgment about IETF technology and its relationship to technology developed elsewhere.

Area Directors (ADs) select the Working Group (WG) Chairs, and then work with them to manage IETF WGs. So, IESG members should possess sufficient interpersonal and management skills to manage 15 to 30 part-time people. Most ADs are also responsible for the management of one or more directorates or review teams. The ability to identify good leaders and technical experts, and then recruit them for IETF work is important. Experience as a WG Chair provides important understanding of that role, and it will help when working with WG Chairs to resolve problems and issues that may arise.

All IESG members should have strong technical knowledge that crosses two or three IETF Areas. An ideal IESG member has made significant technical contributions in more than one IETF Area, preferably authoring documents and/or chairing WGs in more than one IETF Area. Breadth of technical ability and the facility to quickly grasp concepts outside of their strongest areas are more important than specific technical expertise. Experience from a broad range of backgrounds across the entire IESG is desirable.

An AD need not be the ultimate expert and authority in any technical area. The ability to manage, guide and judge consensus, and mentor other IETF participants to take the technical lead is at least as important, if not more important, than their own technical abilities.

An AD must be able to personally review every Internet-Draft that they sponsor. For other Internet-Drafts an AD needs simply to be satisfied that adequate review has taken place, though many ADs personally review these documents as well.

It is very helpful for an IESG member to have a good working knowledge of the IETF document process as well as WG creation and chartering process. This knowledge is most likely to be found in experienced WG Chairs, but may also be found in authors of multiple documents. It is very helpful for an IESG member to have experience attending multiple IETF meetings, creating WG session agendas, supervising WG sessions, and helping to arrange interim WG meetings.

IESG members must have strong verbal and written communications skills. They must have a proven track record of leading and contributing to the consensus of diverse groups.

An IESG member should be able to guide WGs to follow their charters and nurture new talent to fulfill IETF leadership roles in the future.

A FEW COMMENTS ON THE IESG ROLE

Though not part of our formal summary of desired expertise, the IESG wanted to make the NomCom aware of the substantial time commitment that serving on the IESG entails. The basic IESG activities consume between 25 and 40 hours per week. The time commitment varies by Area and by month, with the most intense periods immediately before and during IETF meetings. Historically, many ADs have spent approximately full time on IETF-related activities, especially new ADs during their first year. Most IESG members also participate in additional IETF leadership activities, further increasing the time commitment for those individuals. While most ADs do not occupy formal liaison positions, they may need to interact with external groups such as other standards development organizations (SDOs), which may require travel. We have also found IESG member attendance at all IETF meetings to be imperative, typically arriving one or two days early. IESG members also attend one, and sometimes two, IESG retreats per year.

Because of the large time and travel commitments, IESG members have found sponsor support for the whole two-year term essential. Because of personal impact, including awkwardly timed conference calls, the family of the IESG member must also be supportive.

SPECIFIC AREA EXPERTISE FOR THE Routing AD

The Routing Area is responsible for ensuring continuous operation of the Internet routing system by maintaining the scalability and stability characteristics of the existing routing protocols, as well as developing new protocols, extensions, and bug fixes in a timely manner. Forwarding methods (such as destination-based unicast and multicast forwarding, MPLS, and pseudowire) as well as associated routing and signalling protocols (such as OSPF, IS-IS, BGP, RSVP-TE, LDP, PIM, RPL, and VPNs at Layer 2, Layer 3, and within data centers) are within the scope of the Routing Area. The Routing Area also works on Generalized MPLS used in the control plane of optical networks as well as security aspects of the routing system.

A Routing AD must have solid knowledge of the Internet routing system and its operations. A Routing AD must be proficient in at least one of the mainstream routing protocol or technology such as BGP, OSPF, IS-IS, MPLS, GMPLS, or multicast. Implementation and deployment experience as well as significant contributions to the WGs in the Routing Area are highly desirable.

The Routing Area intersects most frequently with the Internet Area, the Operations and Management Area, and the Security Area. Interaction with the Internet Area concentrates mainly on IP forwarding and encapsulation, and IS-IS/Trill. With the Operations and Management Area the focus is on development of MIB modules, and consideration of management and operation of routing infrastructure. With the Security Area the focus is on routing protocol security. Cross-area expertise in any of those areas would be useful.

Work in the Routing Area often overlaps with work in other SDOs. In particular, there have been interactions with the ITU-T on MPLS-TP and GMPLS, and with the IEEE on link aggregation. From time to time these interactions can consume a considerable amount of time, requiring careful interaction through the liaison process and attendance at meetings of other SDOs. Knowledge of the workings of other SDOs would be beneficial.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IAOC/IETF Trust position

IAOC/ IETF Trust Position Description
---------------------------------------------------

The Nomcom is responsible for appointing a single individual from the IETF community to serve as a member
of the IETF Administrative Oversight Committee (IAOC) and as a trustee of the IETF Trust.

This note outlines the expertise and duties for a member of the IAOC and the IETF Trust.
It is posted for the process of filling the IAOC/Trust position that becomes vacant in March 2014.

The structure of the IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA) is described in and regulated by BCP101.

BCP101 defines the IASA as:

The IETF Administrative Support Activity (IASA) provides the
administrative structure required to support the IETF standards
process and to support the IETF's technical activities. As of the
time at which this document was written, this included the work of
IETF working groups, the IESG, the IAB, and the IRTF. Should the
IETF standards process at some future date come to include other
technical activities, the IAOC is responsible for developing plans to
provide administrative support for them. Such support includes, as
appropriate, undertaking or contracting for the work described in
[RFC3716], including IETF document and data management, IETF
meetings, and any operational agreements or contracts with the RFC
Editor and the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). The IASA
is also ultimately responsible for the financial activities
associated with IETF administrative support, such as collecting IETF
meeting fees, paying invoices, managing budgets and financial
accounts, and so forth.

The IASA is responsible for ensuring that the IETF's administrative
needs are met, and met well. The IETF does not expect the IASA to
undertake the bulk of this work directly; rather, the IETF expects
the IASA to contract this work from others and to manage these
contractual relationships to achieve efficiency, transparency, and
cost effectiveness.

The IASA is distinct from IETF-related technical functions, such as
the RFC Editor, the IANA, and the IETF standards process itself. The
IASA has no influence on the technical decisions of the IETF or on
the technical contents of IETF work. Note, however, that this in no
way prevents people who form part of the IASA from participating as
individuals in IETF technical activities.

The exact mechanics of how the IAOC operates and governs are further described in BCP101. Besides
providing the above-mentioned operational support for the IETF together with and through the IAD,
the members of the IAOC as well as the IAD serve as Trustees of the IETF Trust. It holds the IETF's
intellectual property assets, for example in the form of copyrights to the RFCs, the name IETF,
logo etc.

BCP101 in Section 3.2 defines the role of the IAOC as:

The IAOC's role is to provide appropriate direction to the IAD, to
review the IAD's regular reports, and to oversee IASA functions to
ensure that the administrative needs of the IETF community are being
properly met. The IAOC's mission is not to be engaged in the day-
to-day administrative work of the IASA, but rather to provide
appropriate direction, oversight, and approval.

Therefore, the IAOC's responsibilities are as follows:

o To select the IAD and to provide high-level review and direction
for his or her work. This task should be handled by a sub-
committee, as defined above [in BCP101].

o To review the IAD's plans and contracts to ensure that they will
meet the administrative needs of the IETF.

o To track whether the IASA functions are meeting the IETF
community's administrative needs, and to work with the IAD to
determine a plan for corrective action if they are not.

o To review the IAD's budget proposals to ensure that they will meet
the IETF's needs, and to review the IAD's regular financial
reports.

o To ensure that the IASA is run in a transparent and accountable
manner. Although the day-to-day work should be delegated to the
IAD and others, the IAOC is responsible for ensuring that IASA
finances and operational status are tracked appropriately, and
that monthly, quarterly, and annual financial and operational
reports are published to the IETF community.

o To designate, in consultation with the IAB and the IESG, the
person or people who carry out the tasks that other IETF process
documents say are carried out by the IETF Executive Director.

The IAOC's role is to direct and review, not to perform, the work of
the IAD and IASA. The IAOC holds periodic teleconferences and face-
to-face meetings as needed to carry out the IAOC's duties efficiently
and effectively.

If there is no IAD or if the IAD is unavailable, the IAOC may
temporarily assign the IAD's duties to individual members of the
IAOC.

The update (RFC4371) to the original BCP101 (RFC4071) outlines the IETF Trust. The IETF Trust
is therein defined as:

A Trust ("the IETF Trust") has been formed for the purpose of
acquiring, holding, maintaining, and licensing certain existing and
future intellectual property and other property used in connection
with the administration of the IETF. The Trust was formed by the
signatures of its Settlors and initial Trustees. The Settlors, who
contributed initial intellectual property to the Trust, were ISOC and
the Corporation for National Research Initiatives. The Trustees of
the IETF Trust are the members of the IAOC, and the Beneficiary of
the IETF Trust is the IETF as a whole.

In its administration of IPR under the terms of BCP 101, the IASA,
including the IAD and the IAOC, will treat the IETF Trust rather than
ISOC as the proper entity for ownership and licensing of IETF IPR.
Specifically, references to ISOC in sections 3.1, 5.3, and 7 of RFC 4071
shall be interpreted as referring to the IETF Trust wherever IPR
issues are concerned. The duty to serve as Trustees is added to
section 3.2 of RFC 4071.

IAOC members also serve as Trustees, and should be willing and able to agree in writing to
fulfill the duties of a Trustee under the terms of the IETF Trust Agreement. The Trust Agreement
is available at

http://iaoc.ietf.org/docs/IETF-Trust-Agreement-Executed-12-15-05.pdf

Based on the above mentioned roles, duties, responsibilities and experience in operating the
IASA so far, the current IAOC believes the following base of experience is valuable in serving
as a member of the IAOC as well bringing value to the IAOC:

o Previous management experience, such as team-leader, group director,
etc. is essential.

o Previous budget responsibilities. The ability to work with budget and
financial terminology, as well as basic knowledge of accounting and
auditing practices and regulations is essential.

o Previous experience in the IETF, and a good understanding of the IETF
processes, such as having been a working-group chair, IESG or IAB
member, certainly helps.

o Have complementary backgrounds and experience.

Due to the structure of the IAOC and IETF trust only a subset of IAOC members can serve as IAOC
and IETF Trust chairs. Only the NOMCOM, IESG, IAB, and ISOC appointed IAOC members are so eligible.
The IAOC also believes it is inappropriate for the ISOC appointed IAOC member to serve as one of the
chairs, even though it is not prohibited by BCP101 Overall, the IAOC believes that it is important
that people appointed to the IAOC have the capability and interest to serve in one of the chair
positions at some time during their IAOC term.

The IAOC has formed a number of subcommittees that are made up of its members and other,
invited participants. These subcommittees make recommendations to the full IAOC. Committees
conduct work through email and, typically, once-a-month calls.

At the time of writing, the set of subcommittees is:

o Finance
o Legal Management
o Meetings
o Technology Management
o Tools Development
o Request For Proposals (RFP)
o Remote Participation Services (RPS)

Information on the committees can be found at: http://iaoc.ietf.org/committees.html

The workload varies periodically, depending upon the items on the IAOC/Trust's plate. For example
around times of RFPs issued for the various contracted services, the load is higher. On average
over the year, the time commitment is likely to be 5-10 hours a week. Mail volume is generally low,
but there are periods of contract and related paper reviews.

At the time this note is being written, the IAOC and the IETF Trust operate through conference
calls, meetings at IETF meetings, and one or two face-to-face retreats per year.

The current call schedule is usually at 10am Eastern Time on:

1st Thursday of the month -- IAOC
3rd Thursday of the month -- IAOC/Trust

Each subcommittee typically has one call per month, usually during the second week of the month.

Call times are adapted to suit the current membership of the IAOC, and are only provided to give
an overview of the regular, group workload.

Summary of Desired Expertise for IAB position
=IAB Job Description=

==The IAB Role==

The IAB is chartered both as a committee of the IETF and as an advisory body of the Internet Society. The IAB acts as a source of advice and guidance concerning technical, architectural and procedural matters pertaining to the Internet and its enabling technologies; this includes both reviewing proposed new work and providing input to the IESG as well as providing perspective to the broader community on important issues. The IAB develops and documents architectural insight and guidance for the Internet. It provides architectural input into IETF technical activities as well as sponsoring and organizing work in the IRTF. The IAB also has several procedural roles to support the operation of the IETF including being the formal channel for liaisons with other organizations.

===Architectural role===

The IAB oversees various aspects of the architecture for the protocols and technical specifications as developed by the IETF, as well as overseeing activities in the IRTF. While the IAB does draw on specific expertise as required, it is expected that the sum of the expertise of IAB members encompasses a broad range of technologies under IETF and IRTF study, and also encompasses a broad range of perspectives on these specifications, from research and academic study through development, deployment and operational experience.

A major role of the IAB is to take a broad and long range perspective to offer input into the planning and coordination among different areas of Internet activities, including those of the IETF and IRTF. The IAB, both collectively and on an individual basis, is expected to pay attention to important long-term issues in the Internet, and to make sure that these issues are brought to the attention of the groups that are in a position to address them. The IAB maintains open communications channels with other bodies engaged in Internet governance, including ICANN, the Regional Internet Registries, and ISOC, and provides technical and architectural input as appropriate. As needed, the IAB works with ISOC to provide advice and guidance to the Internet community on technical, architectural, procedural, and policy matters pertaining to the Internet and its enabling technologies. That advice and guidance are provided to the public, to the Board of Trustees and Officers of the Internet Society, and to the larger community as circumstances dictate.

===Organizational role===

The IAB has a number roles within the organizational functioning of the IETF. While these roles require administrative rather than technical work, they form a large and important part of the IABs activities. All IAB members need to be prepared to participate (to varying degrees) in these activities.

The IAB serves as an appeal board for complaints of improper execution of the standards process, acting on appeals in respect of IESG standards decisions. In addition, the IAB appoints ISOC BoT members as well as a member of the IAOC, and hears appeals on matters related to the IAOC and IAD.

The IAB is responsible for the RFC Editor function, including appointing and overseeing the RFC Series Editor. The IAB provides direction for the administration of the IETF's protocol parameters registries (the IANA function). The IAB selects a chair of the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) for a renewable two year term, and oversees the IRTF's activities.

The IAB has a role in the IETF Nominations Committee process: the IAB confirms the IETF Chair and the Area Directors (IESG).

The IAB is responsible for liaisons between the IETF and other organizations that undertake activities that overlap or intersect with the IETF's activities including other standards development organizations. The IAB appoints liaison managers to manage these relationships, and deals with liaison matters of an architectural or general procedural nature. The IAB becomes actively involved when these liaison relationships have difficulties, for example, in determining clear boundaries of responsibility. The IAB also appoints a member to the ICANN Nomcom and a liaison to the ICANN board to represent the IETF's interests within ICANN. IAB members fulfill the role of liaison "shepherds" to advise the liaison managers and to act as review point for assessing the efficacy of liaison activities and the liaison manager's duties.

== IAB Organization ==

In order to enhance institutional memory and enable the development of medium and long term activities, the IAB has organized its work in several areas in the form of programs. A program is a high priority, long term activity scoped and managed by the IAB, which can be thought of as an IAB directorate, small task force, or an ad-hoc body of (independent) technical experts (see RFC2850 Section 2.1). Program outputs include IAB documents and positions. All IAB members are expected to review and comment on program outputs that represent the consensus of the IAB. In order to ensure that all IAB activities have IAB participation, members of the IAB are expected to actively participate in one or more programs.

The program leads, who will usually be IAB members, communicate the program plan to the community, solicit feedback, facilitate activities within the program, provide oversight and ensure continuity. The program lead will typically nominate non-IAB members to the program, subject to IAB approval, will develop the program plan, will organize regular program conference calls, and will develop consensus within the program for recommendations to be made to the IAB. The lead doesn’t need to have specific expertise in the area, but must have good general understanding of the issues from technical, business, and or policy perspective. The IAB as a whole will periodically review the state of the programs and their progress, and make necessary adjustments and prioritization. This includes a review of the program membership, activity plan and progress against deliverables. Current IAB programs include:

o Liaison Oversight Program
o ITU-T Coordination Program
o RFC Editor Program
o Privacy Program
o Internationalization Program
o IANA Evolution Program
o IP Evolution Program
o Emergency Services Program
o IAB Tools and Processes Program
o Security Program (forthcoming)

==IAB Member Qualities==

IAB members are expected to act at the "Board" level.

The IAB is most effective when it is composed of a diverse set of individuals with a broad range of technical skills, architectural perspectives and backgrounds. For example, it is desirable for IAB members to have technical leadership experience, operational management backgrounds, research or academic backgrounds, implementation experience, and experience in other bodies involved in Internet governance. Likewise it is desirable for IAB members to have had experiences with differing technical challenges and requirements, including those that vary by geographic region. It is critical that IAB members be willing and able to work with each other to develop a shared viewpoint.

Some IAB activities are very specialized - for example, managing liaison relationships with other SDOs on behalf of the IETF. It is advantageous for the IAB when NomCom ensures that at least some IAB members have sufficient managerial skills to understand the issues that need to come to the IAB by managing and documenting inter-SDO liaison relationships on a strategic basis.

While it is advantageous for at least some IAB membership to have expertise in the IAB's current program topics, it is more important for the IAB to have membership who are experienced in managing volunteer teams, and who can build teams, motivate program work, and direct one or more programs even in the absence of in-depth knowledge about specific program topics. The IAB needs at least some members with program management skills that will facilitate interfacing between programs and the IAB.

===IAB members===

* are normally highly regarded in one or more domains of technical subject matter. They may be recognized in a particular area as being a domain expert, but must also exhibit advanced architectural and technical competence.
* should be willing and able to apply those technical skills and analytic thinking to understand and usefully contribute to discussions in other areas and to have interests broad enough that they are willing and able to contribute to discussions on new areas as appropriate.
* should be willing and able to apply their managerial skills to new areas.
* should be constructive in framing new approaches, technically or in terms of communication.
* should be willing and able to work well with others.
* should be willing and able to constructively contribute to consensus-based processes.
* should have substantial experience within the IETF, and an understanding of its processes and workings.
* should be willing and able to commit the time to follow the IAB, IRTF and IETF discussions on a regular basis. This commitment should extend to regular attendance at IAB teleconferences and attendance in person at IETF meetings, IAB workshops, an annual IAB retreat, as well as the commitment to review material and generate and edit documentation. It may also extend to leading open discussion forums and active participation in IETF WG and IRTF RG activity. The time commitment in "normal weeks" (i.e., those not containing IETF meetings, retreats, or workshops) is typically one to three days a week or more for IAB members that are fully engaged; simply tracking the various mailing list and documents often takes up to a day a week. IAB members are likely to be tapped by ADs to do reviews of specialized documents and other tasks, potentially adding to those numbers. About a quarter to half of the time is spent on the organizational activities. The time commitment at IETF meetings includes time on Sunday (at the latest, IAB members need to plan to arrive at IETF meetings on the preceeding Saturday), early mornings, Friday afternoon meetings, as well as coverage of BOFs for technical review. An annual retreat will be scheduled for up to three days in late April or early May.

====References:====
* [http://www.iab.org/about/overview.html IAB Role]
* [http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2850.txt IAB Charter]
* [http://www.iab.org/about/description.html IAB Role Description]
* [http://www.iab.org/activities/programs/ IAB Program Description]