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Native NAT Traversal Mode for the Host Identity Protocol
draft-ietf-hip-native-nat-traversal-07

Document type: Active Internet-Draft (hip WG)
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2014-06-23
Intended RFC status: Unknown
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

IETF State: WG Document
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: I-D Exists
Responsible AD: (None)
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HIP Working Group                                             A. Keranen
Internet-Draft                                                  J. Melen
Intended status: Standards Track                                Ericsson
Expires: December 25, 2014                                 June 23, 2014

        Native NAT Traversal Mode for the Host Identity Protocol
                 draft-ietf-hip-native-nat-traversal-07

Abstract

   This document specifies a new Network Address Translator (NAT)
   traversal mode for the Host Identity Protocol (HIP).  The new mode is
   based on the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) methodology
   and UDP encapsulation of data and signaling traffic.  The main
   difference from the previously specified modes is the use of HIP
   messages for all NAT traversal procedures.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on December 25, 2014.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of

Keranen & Melen         Expires December 25, 2014               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        HIP Native NAT Traversal Mode            June 2014

   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Protocol Description  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     3.1.  Relay Registration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.2.  Registration Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.3.  Forwarding Rules and Permissions  . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.4.  Relaying UDP Encapsulated Data and Control Packets  . . .   6
     3.5.  Candidate Gathering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.6.  Base Exchange via HIP Relay Server  . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.7.  Native NAT Traversal Mode Negotiation . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.8.  Connectivity Check Pacing Negotiation . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.9.  Connectivity Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.10. NAT Keepalives  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     3.11. Handling Conflicting SPI Values . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   4.  Packet Formats  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     4.1.  RELAYED_ADDRESS and MAPPED_ADDRESS Parameters . . . . . .   9
     4.2.  PEER_PERMISSION Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
     4.3.  HIP Connectivity Check Packets  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14

1.  Introduction

   The Host Identity Protocol (HIP) [I-D.ietf-hip-rfc5201-bis] is
   specified to run directly on top of IPv4 or IPv6.  However, many
   middleboxes found in the Internet, such as NATs and firewalls, often
   allow only UDP or TCP traffic to pass [RFC5207].  Also, especially
   NATs usually require the host behind a NAT to create a forwarding
   state in the NAT before other hosts outside of the NAT can contact
   the host behind the NAT.  To overcome this problem, different
   methods, commonly referred to as NAT traversal techniques, have been
   developed.

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