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An Architecture for IP/LDP Fast-Reroute Using Maximally Redundant Trees
draft-ietf-rtgwg-mrt-frr-architecture-04

Document type: Active Internet-Draft (rtgwg WG)
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2014-07-04
Intended RFC status: Unknown
Other versions: plain text, pdf, xml, html

IETF State: WG Document Jul 2015
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: I-D Exists
Responsible AD: (None)
Send notices to: No addresses provided

Routing Area Working Group                                 A. Atlas, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                                 R. Kebler
Intended status: Standards Track                               C. Bowers
Expires: January 5, 2015                                Juniper Networks
                                                               G. Enyedi
                                                              A. Csaszar
                                                             J. Tantsura
                                                                Ericsson
                                                      M. Konstantynowicz
                                                           Cisco Systems
                                                                R. White
                                                                     VCE
                                                            July 4, 2014

An Architecture for IP/LDP Fast-Reroute Using Maximally Redundant Trees
                draft-ietf-rtgwg-mrt-frr-architecture-04

Abstract

   With increasing deployment of Loop-Free Alternates (LFA) [RFC5286],
   it is clear that a complete solution for IP and LDP Fast-Reroute is
   required.  This specification provides that solution.  IP/LDP Fast-
   Reroute with Maximally Redundant Trees (MRT-FRR) is a technology that
   gives link-protection and node-protection with 100% coverage in any
   network topology that is still connected after the failure.

   MRT removes all need to engineer for coverage.  MRT is also extremely
   computationally efficient.  For any router in the network, the MRT
   computation is less than the LFA computation for a node with three or
   more neighbors.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at http://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 5, 2015.

Atlas, et al.            Expires January 5, 2015                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        MRT Unicast FRR Architecture             July 2014

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2014 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Importance of 100% Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     1.2.  Partial Deployment and Backwards Compatibility  . . . . .   6
   2.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   4.  Maximally Redundant Trees (MRT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Maximally Redundant Trees (MRT) and Fast-Reroute  . . . . . .  10
   6.  Unicast Forwarding with MRT Fast-Reroute  . . . . . . . . . .  11
     6.1.  MRT Forwarding Mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
       6.1.1.  MRT LDP labels  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
         6.1.1.1.  Topology-scoped FEC encoded using a single label
                   (Option 1A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
         6.1.1.2.  Topology and FEC encoded using a two label stack
                   (Option 1B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
         6.1.1.3.  Compatibility of Option 1A and 1B . . . . . . . .  13
         6.1.1.4.  Mandatory support for MRT LDP Label option 1A . .  13
       6.1.2.  MRT IP tunnels (Options 2A and 2B)  . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.2.  Forwarding LDP Unicast Traffic over MRT Paths . . . . . .  14
       6.2.1.  Forwarding LDP traffic using MRT LDP Labels (Option
               1A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
       6.2.2.  Forwarding LDP traffic using MRT LDP Labels (Option

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