datatracker.ietf.org
Sign in
Version 5.6.3, 2014-09-19
Report a bug

Requirements for Traffic Engineering Over MPLS
RFC 2702

Document type: RFC - Informational (September 1999; Errata)
Document stream: IETF
Last updated: 2013-03-02
Other versions: plain text, pdf, html

IETF State: (None)
Document shepherd: No shepherd assigned

IESG State: RFC 2702 (Informational)
Responsible AD: (None)
Send notices to: No addresses provided

Network Working Group                                          D. Awduche
Request for Comments: 2702                                     J. Malcolm
Category: Informational                                        J. Agogbua
                                                                M. O'Dell
                                                               J. McManus
                                                     UUNET (MCI Worldcom)
                                                           September 1999

             Requirements for Traffic Engineering Over MPLS

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of this
   memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document presents a set of requirements for Traffic Engineering
   over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS). It identifies the
   functional capabilities required to implement policies that
   facilitate efficient and reliable network operations in an MPLS
   domain. These capabilities can be used to optimize the utilization of
   network resources and to enhance traffic oriented performance
   characteristics.

Table of Contents

   1.0   Introduction .............................................  2
   1.1   Terminology ..............................................  3
   1.2   Document Organization ....................................  3
   2.0   Traffic Engineering ......................................  4
   2.1   Traffic Engineering Performance Objectives ...............  4
   2.2   Traffic and Resource Control .............................  6
   2.3   Limitations of Current IGP Control Mechanisms ............  6
   3.0   MPLS and Traffic Engineering .............................  7
   3.1   Induced MPLS Graph .......................................  9
   3.2   The Fundamental Problem of Traffic Engineering Over MPLS .  9
   4.0   Augmented Capabilities for Traffic Engineering Over MPLS . 10
   5.0   Traffic Trunk Attributes and Characteristics   ........... 10
   5.1   Bidirectional Traffic Trunks ............................. 11
   5.2   Basic Operations on Traffic Trunks ....................... 12
   5.3   Accounting and Performance Monitoring .................... 12

Awduche, et al.              Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 2702                MPLS Traffic Engineering          September 1999

   5.4   Basic Attributes of Traffic Trunks ....................... 13
   5.5   Traffic Parameter Attributes  ............................ 14
   5.6   Generic Path Selection and Management Attributes ......... 14
   5.6.1 Administratively Specified Explicit Paths ................ 15
   5.6.2 Hierarchy of Preference Rules for Multi-paths ............ 15
   5.6.3 Resource Class Affinity Attributes ....................... 16
   5.6.4 Adaptivity Attribute ..................................... 17
   5.6.5 Load Distribution Across Parallel Traffic Trunks ......... 18
   5.7   Priority Attribute ....................................... 18
   5.8   Preemption Attribute ..................................... 18
   5.9   Resilience Attribute ..................................... 19
   5.10  Policing Attribute  ...................................... 20
   6.0   Resource Attributes ...................................... 21
   6.1   Maximum Allocation Multiplier ............................ 21
   6.2   Resource Class Attribute  ................................ 22
   7.0   Constraint-Based Routing  ................................ 22
   7.1   Basic Features of Constraint-Based Routing ............... 23
   7.2   Implementation Considerations ............................ 24
   8.0   Conclusion   ............................................. 25
   9.0   Security Considerations .................................. 26
   10.0  References   ............................................. 26
   11.0  Acknowledgments .......................................... 27
   12.0  Authors' Addresses ....................................... 28
   13.0  Full Copyright Statement ................................. 29

1.0 Introduction

   Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) [1,2] integrates a label
   swapping framework with network layer routing. The basic idea
   involves assigning short fixed length labels to  packets at the
   ingress to an MPLS cloud (based on the concept of forwarding
   equivalence classes [1,2]). Throughout the interior of the MPLS
   domain, the labels attached to packets are used to make forwarding
   decisions  (usually without recourse to the original packet headers).

   A set of powerful constructs to address many critical issues in the
   emerging differentiated services Internet can be devised from this

[include full document text]