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Versions: 00                                                            
INTERNET-DRAFT                                                 Doug Kehn
draft-kehn-info-ppp-ipcp-ext-00.txt              Efficient Networks Inc.
Category: Informational                                         May 2003
Expires: November 2003

           PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol Extensions
                                  for
                          Route Table Entries

Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is subject to all provisions
   of Section 10 of RFC2026.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress".

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ieft/1id-abstracts.txt

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) [1] provides a standard method for
   transporting multi-protocol datagrams over point-to-point links.  PPP
   defines a family of Network Control Protocols (NCPs) for establishing
   and configuring different network-layer protocols.  The PPP Internet
   Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP) [2] defines the NCP for establishing
   and configuring the Internet Protocol (IP) [3].

   This document extends IPCP by defining the negotiation of IP route
   table entries.  This extension provides added functionality but is
   optional and preserves compatibility.

1. Introduction



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   PPP is widely used by broadband service providers as the protocol of
   choice for connecting hosts to the Internet.  PPP is popular because
   it is a well-known protocol that has been utilized by dial-up service
   providers for many years.  PPP also provides per-user access control,
   billing, etc.  These later features of PPP are the most appealing to
   providers.  In recent years, PPP has seen two transport extensions
   emerge to support broadband access.  These transports are PPP over
   Ethernet (PPPoE) [5] and PPP over AAL5 (PPPoA) [6].  With the
   emergence of broadband, the PPP client is migrating from the
   subscribers PC to the broadband customer premise equipment (CPE).

   Broadband provides more bandwidth to the subscriber.  Broadband
   service providers are wanting to utilize this additional bandwidth to
   provide additional services to subscribers.  Service Providers, for
   obvious reasons, desire to isolate these additional services from
   standard Internet service.  As stated earlier, PPP provides the per-
   user access control, billing, etc.  This makes PPP a logical choice
   for providing these additional services.  PPP also allows the service
   provider to utilize its investment in networking hardware used to
   provide standard Internet access.

   If PPP is to be used for both Internet access and additional service
   access, PPP hosts (whether residing in the PC or CPE) must be able to
   establish multiple PPP links.  The presence of multiple PPP links can
   complicate packet routing decisions in the host.  This document
   proposes an extension to IPCP to address the packet routing issues
   induced in the presence of multiple PPP links.  The extension
   provides the ability to add route table entries for specific PPP
   interfaces.

2. Conventions

   The keywords MUST, MUST NOT, REQUIRED, SHALL, SHALL NOT, SHOULD,
   SHOULD NOT, RECOMMENDED, MAY, and OPTIONAL, when they appear in this
   document, are to be interpreted as described in [4].

3. Additional IPCP Configuration Option

3.1 Route-Add

   Description

      This configuration option defines a method for negotiating zero or
      more route table entries for the PPP interface on the local
      (client) end of the link.  If the local peer supports the Route-
      Add option, it MUST include the Route-Add option with a length of
      2 to its IPCP Configure Request.  The remote (server) peer, if it
      supports the Route-Add option, SHOULD return the appropriate



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      number of Route-Add option entries in its IPCP response.  If the
      remote peer does not wish to add any route entries to the local
      peer, the remote peer MUST NOT include the Route-Add option in its
      response.  The local peer MUST accept this response as an
      indication that the remote peer does not wish to add any routes to
      the interface.

      If the remote peer does not support the Route-Add option (e.g.
      current implementations), the remote peer MAY reject the Route-Add
      option.  This is an indication to the local peer that the remote
      peer does not support the Route-Add option and IPCP negotiation
      MUST continue with out it.

      A Route-Add option entry with a Route-Address and Route-Mask of
      zero indicates a default route.

      Any routes added via the Route-Add option MUST be deleted when the
      IPCP layer terminates.

   A summary of the Route-Add option format is shown below.  The fields
   are transmitted from left to right and are in network-byte order.

    0                   1                   2                   3
    0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
   |     Type      |    Length     |        Route-Address
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
         Route-Address (cont)      |        Route-Mask
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
         Route-Mask (cont)         |        Route-Next-Hop
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
         Route-Next-Hop (cont)     |        Route-Metric
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
         Route-Metric (cont)       |
   +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   Type

      (To be assigned by IANA)

   Length

      18

   Route-Address

      The four octet field defining the destination network or host
      address.



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   Route-Mask

      The four octet field defining the subnet mask for the route.  For
      host route entries, this field MUST be set to all one's.

   Route-Next-Hop

      The four octet field defining the route's next hop.  This field
      MAY be zero if the next hop for the route is the remote peer.

   Route-Metric

      The four octet field defining the metric value for the route.

Normative References

   [1] Simpson, W., Editor, "The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)", STD 51,
   RFC 1661, Daydreamer, July 1994

   [2] McGregor, G., "PPP Internet Control Protocol", RFC 1332, Merit,
   May 1992.

Informative References

   [3] Postel, J., "Internet Protocol", RFC 971, USC/Information
   Sciences Institute, September 1981.

   [4] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement
   Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997.

   [5] Mamakos, et. al., "A Method for Transmitting PPP Over Ethernet
   (PPPoE)", RFC 2516, February 1999.

   [6] Gross, et. al., "PPP Over AAL5", RFC 2364, July 1998.

Security Considerations

   Security issues are not discussed in this memo.

IANA Considerations

   Requires IPCP option number assignment for the Route-Add option.

Acknowledgments

   This draft was inspired by the "work in progress" <draft-carrel-info-
   pppoe-ext-00.txt>.




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   Special thanks goes to Stephen Lyda (Efficient Networks, Inc.), and
   Dan Dworin (Efficient Networks, Inc.) for their feedback.

Author's Address

   Doug Kehn
   Efficient Networks Inc.
   4849 Alpha Road
   Dallas, TX  75244
   USA

   Phone: +1 972 852 1000
   EMail: dkehn@efficient.com

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