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Versions: 00 01 02 03                                                   
Network Working Group                                          T. Hiller
Internet-Draft                                       Lucent Technologies
Updates: RFC 2472                                                G. Zorn
Category: Informational                                    Cisco Systems
<draft-ietf-pppext-ipv6-dns-addr-03.txt>                       June 2003


     PPP IPV6 Control Protocol Extensions for DNS Server Addresses



Status of this Memo

   This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with
   all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html.

   The distribution of this memo is unlimited.  It is filed as <draft-
   ietf-pppext-ipv6-dns-addr-03.txt> and expires December 14, 2003.
   Please send comments to the pppext Working Group mailing list (ietf-
   ppp@merit.edu) or to the authors (tom.hiller@lucent.com and
   gwz@cisco.com).


Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003).  All Rights Reserved.


Abstract

   The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard method for
   transporting multi-protocol datagrams over point-to-point links.  PPP



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   defines an extensible Link Control Protocol and a family of Network
   Control Protocols (NCPs) for establishing and configuring different
   network-layer protocols.

   This document extends the NCP for establishing and configuring
   Version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPV6) over PPP, defining the
   negotiation of primary and alternative Domain Name System (DNS)
   server IPV6 addresses.


1.  Introduction

   The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) [STD51] provides a standard method
   for transporting multi-protocol datagrams over point-to-point links.
   PPP defines an extensible Link Control Protocol and a family of
   Network Control Protocols (NCPs) for establishing and configuring
   different network-layer protocols.

   This document extends the NCP for establishing and configuring
   Version 6 of the Internet Protocol (IPV6) over PPP [RFC2472],
   defining the negotiation of primary and alternate Domain Name System
   (DNS) server addresses for IPV6 [RFC1034] [RFC1035] [RFC1886].


2.  Conventions used in this document

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED",  "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].


3.  Additional IPV6CP Configuration Options

   The two name server address configuration options, TBD1 and TBD2,
   provide a method of obtaining the addresses of Domain Name System
   (DNS) servers on the remote IPV6 network.

   For implementation convenience, these options are designed to serve
   identical purposes, except that when both are present an attempt
   SHOULD be made to resolve names using the primary address before
   using the alternative server address.


3.1.  Primary DNS Server IPV6 Address

   Description
      This Configuration Option defines a method for negotiating with
      the remote peer the IPV6 address of the primary DNS server to be



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      used on the local end of the link.  If the local peer requests an
      invalid server address (which it will typically do intentionally)
      the remote peer specifies the address by NAKing this option, and
      returning the Ipv6 address of a valid DNS server.

      By default, no primary DNS address is provided.

      A summary of the Primary DNS IPV6 Address Configuration Option
      format is shown below.  The fields are transmitted from left to
      right.

       0                   1                   2                   3
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |     Type      |    Length     |      Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr    |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr (cont'd.)               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr (cont'd.)               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr (cont'd.)               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr (cont'd.)|
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


   Type
      TBD1

   Length
      18

   Primary-DNS-IPV6-Addr
      The sixteen octet Primary-DNS-Addr is the address (in network
      byte order) of the primary DNS server to be used by the local
      peer.  If all sixteen octets are set to zero, it indicates an
      explicit request that the peer provide the address information in
      a Config-Nak packet.

   Default
      No address is provided.


3.2.  Alternative DNS Server IPV6 Address

   Description
      This Configuration Option defines a method for negotiating with
      the remote peer the IPV6 address of an alternate DNS server to be



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INTERNET-DRAFT        IPV6CP DNS Server Extensions             June 2003


      used on the local end of the link.  If the local peer requests an
      invalid server address (which it will typically do intentionally)
      the remote peer specifies the address by NAKing this option, and
      returning the IPV6 address of a valid DNS server.

      By default, no alternative DNS address is provided.

      A summary of the Alternative DNS Server IPV6 Address
      Configuration Option format is shown below.  The fields are
      transmitted from left to right.

       0                   1                   2                   3
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |     Type      |    Length     |        Alt-DNS-IPV6-Addr      |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Alt-DNS-IPV6-Address (cont'd.)                |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Alt-DNS-IPV6-Address (cont'd.)                |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                 Alt-DNS-IPV6-Address (cont'd.)                |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      | Alt-DNS-IPV6-Address (cont'd.)|
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

   Type
      TBD2

   Length
      18

   Alt-DNS-IPV6-Address
      The sixteen octet Secondary-DNS-IPV6-Address is the IPV6 address
      (in network byte order) of the secondary DNS server to be used
      by the local peer.  If all sixteen octets are set to zero, it
      indicates an explicit request that the peer provide the address
      information in a Config-Nak packet.

   Default
      No address is provided.


Normative References

[RFC2119]   S. Bradner, "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
            Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997





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[STD51]     W. Simpson, Editor, "The Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)", STD
            51, RFC 1661, July 1994

[RFC2472]   Haskin, D., E. Allen, "IP Version 6 over PPP", RFC 2472,
            December 1998

[RFC1034]   P. Mockapetris, "Domain Names - Concepts and Facilities",
            STD 13, RFC 1034, November 1987.

[RFC1035]   P. Mockapetris, "Domain Names - Implementation and
            Specification", STD 13, RFC 1035, November 1987.

[RFC1886]   Thomson, S. and C. Huitema, "DNS Extensions to support IP
            version 6", RFC 1886, December 1995.


Informative References

[RFC1877]   S. Cobb, "PPP Internet Protocol Control Protocol Extensions
            for Name Server Addresses", RFC 1877, December 1995.


Security Considerations

   The use of these extensions is as secure as the link itself.


Acknowledgments

   A major portion of the text in this memo was stolen from RFC 1877
   [RFC1877].  Thanks to Soohong Daniel Park for useful feedback.


Authors' Addresses

   Tom Hiller
   Lucent Technologies
   1960 Lucent Lane
   Naperville, IL 60566
   USA

   Phone: +1 (630) 979 7673
   Email: tom.hiller@lucent.com


   Glen Zorn
   Cisco Systems, Inc.
   500 108th Avenue N.E., Suite 500



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INTERNET-DRAFT        IPV6CP DNS Server Extensions             June 2003


   Bellevue, WA 98004
   USA

   Phone: +1 (425) 344-8113
   Email: gwz@cisco.com


Full Copyright Statement

   "Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2003). All Rights Reserved.
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Expiration Date

   This memo is filed as <draft-ietf-pppext-ipv6-dns-addr-03.txt> and
   expires December 14, 2003.















































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