Service Function discovery in fog environments
draft-bernardos-sfc-discovery-01

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Last updated 2018-09-03
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SFC WG                                                     CJ. Bernardos
Internet-Draft                                                      UC3M
Intended status: Experimental                                  A. Mourad
Expires: March 7, 2019                                      InterDigital
                                                       September 3, 2018

             Service Function discovery in fog environments
                    draft-bernardos-sfc-discovery-01

Abstract

   Service function chaining (SFC) allows the instantiation of an
   ordered set of service functions and subsequent "steering" of traffic
   through them.  Service functions provide an specific treatment of
   received packets, therefore they need to be known so they can be used
   in a given service composition via SFC.  This document discusses the
   need for service function discovery mechanisms and propose some
   solutions for sfc-aware nodes to discover available service functions
   in fog environments.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on March 7, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect

Bernardos & Mourad        Expires March 7, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                SF discovery                September 2018

   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Problem statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Discovery of SF in a multi-provider fog/edge environment    4
   4.  Network-based SF discovery  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.1.  ICMPv6-based SF discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.2.  DHCPv6-based SF discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   7.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9

1.  Introduction

   Virtualization of functions provides operators with tools to deploy
   new services much faster, as compared to the traditional use of
   monolithic and tightly integrated dedicated machinery.  As a natural
   next step, mobile network operators need to re-think how to evolve
   their existing network infrastructures and how to deploy new ones to
   address the challenges posed by the increasing customers' demands, as
   well as by the huge competition among operators.  All these changes
   are triggering the need for a modification in the way operators and
   infrastructure providers operate their networks, as they need to
   significantly reduce the costs incurred in deploying a new service
   and operating it.  Some of the mechanisms that are being considered
   and already adopted by operators include: sharing of network
   infrastructure to reduce costs, virtualization of core servers
   running in data centers as a way of supporting their load-aware
   elastic dimensioning, and dynamic energy policies to reduce the
   monthly electricity bill.  However, this has proved to be tough to
   put in practice, and not enough.  Indeed, it is not easy to deploy
   new mechanisms in a running operational network due to the high
   dependency on proprietary (and sometime obscure) protocols and
   interfaces, which are complex to manage and often require configuring
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