Human Rights Considerations of Internet Filtering
draft-elkins-hrpc-ifilter-00

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Last updated 2018-10-17
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INTERNET-DRAFT                                                 N. Elkins
Intended Status: Informational                                      EDCO
                                                                B. Shein
                                                   Software Tool and Die
                                                              V. Bertola
                                                           Open-Exchange
                                                                        
Expires: April 20, 2019                                 October 17, 2018

           Human Rights Considerations of Internet Filtering
                      draft-elkins-hrpc-ifilter-00

Abstract

   This document is a survey of the filtering of content.  The focus is
   on the human rights involved as cited in the Universal Declaration of
   Human Rights" which is one of the foundational documents for HRPC.
   The recent years have seen an increase in content filtering for a
   variety of reasons including to further the aims of governments who
   wish to maintain their rule and suppress dissent but also to enforce
   cultural norms, human rights and compliance with the law.  Filters
   also exist for security (botnets, malware etc.), user-defined
   policies (parental control, corporate blocking of social networks
   during work time, etc.), spam control, upload of copyrighted material
   and other reasons. This document is based on several real world
   considerations: the existence of national and regional sovereignty,
   Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and Content Distribution Networks
   (CDNs) that provide connectivity and content hosting services, Over-
   the-top (OTTs) and Content Delivery Platforms (CDPs) that play a
   disproportionate role in capturing the attention and "eyeballs" of
   many of the users of the Internet.

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted to IETF in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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Elkins                   Expires April 20, 2019                 [Page 1]
INTERNET DRAFT                  ifilter                 October 17, 2018

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Copyright and License Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors. All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

 

Elkins                   Expires April 20, 2019                 [Page 2]
INTERNET DRAFT                  ifilter                 October 17, 2018

Table of Contents

   1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   2 Content Filtering by States and Public Authorities . . . . . . .  5
     2.1 Filtering to Prevent Freedom of Assembly or Information  . .  6
     2.2 Filtering to Enforce Cultural Norms  . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     2.3 Filtering to Prevent Violence  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.4 Child Pornography  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     2.5 Unauthorized Gambling and Illegal E-Commerce . . . . . . . .  7
     2.6 User Generated Content (UGC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   3 Content Filtering by Internet Service Providers  . . . . . . . .  8
     3.1 Filtering for Network and Computer Security  . . . . . . . .  9
     3.2 Filtering on Behalf of the User  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     3.3 Filtering for Commercial Reasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   4 Content Filtering by Platforms Providing Content and Services  . 10
     4.1 Enforcing Cultural Norms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
     4.2 Blocking Extremist Activity  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
     4.3 Blocking Activity Inciting Violence  . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
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