Reverse DNS in IPv6 for Internet Service Providers
draft-ietf-dnsop-isp-ip6rdns-04

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (dnsop WG)
Last updated 2017-11-14
Replaces draft-howard-isp-ip6rdns
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Informational
Formats plain text xml pdf html bibtex
Stream WG state In WG Last Call
Document shepherd Suzanne Woolf
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to "Tim Wicinski" <tjw.ietf@gmail.com>, "Suzanne Woolf" <suzworldwide@gmail.com>
Network Working Group                                          L. Howard
Internet-Draft                                                   Retevia
Intended status: Informational                         November 15, 2017
Expires: May 19, 2018

           Reverse DNS in IPv6 for Internet Service Providers
                    draft-ietf-dnsop-isp-ip6rdns-04

Abstract

   In IPv4, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) commonly provide IN-
   ADDR.ARPA information for their customers by prepopulating the zone
   with one PTR record for every available address.  This practice does
   not scale in IPv6.  This document analyzes different approaches and
   considerations for ISPs in managing the ip6.arpa zone for IPv6
   address space assigned to many customers.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 19, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of

Howard                    Expires May 19, 2018                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft        draft-ietf-dnsop-isp-ip6rdns         November 2017

   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Reverse DNS in IPv4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.2.  Reverse DNS Considerations in IPv6  . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   2.  Alternatives in IPv6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.1.  Negative Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Wildcard match  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.3.  Dynamic DNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
       2.3.1.  Dynamic DNS from Individual Hosts . . . . . . . . . .   6
       2.3.2.  Dynamic DNS through Residential Gateways  . . . . . .   7
       2.3.3.  Automatic DNS Delegations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
       2.3.4.  Generate Dynamic Records  . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.3.5.  Populate from DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
       2.3.6.  Populate from RADIUS Server . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     2.4.  Delegate DNS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     2.5.  Dynamically Generate PTR When Queried ('On the Fly')  . .   9
   3.  Manual User Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   4.  Considerations and Recommendations  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   5.  Security and Privacy Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     5.1.  Using Reverse DNS for Security  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     5.2.  DNS Security with Dynamic DNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     5.3.  Considerations for Other Uses of the DNS  . . . . . . . .  11
   6.  Privacy Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   [RFC1912] recommended that "every internet-reachable host should have
   a name" and says "Failure to have matching PTR and A records can
   cause loss of Internet services similar to not being registered in
   the DNS at all."  While the need for a PTR record and for it to match
   is debatable as a best practice, some network services [see
   Section 3] still do rely on PTR lookups, and some check the source
Show full document text