A SIP Response Code for Unwanted Calls
draft-ietf-sipcore-status-unwanted-04

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (sipcore WG)
Last updated 2017-03-21 (latest revision 2017-03-02)
Replaces draft-schulzrinne-dispatch-status-unwanted
Stream IETF
Intended RFC status Proposed Standard
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Stream WG state Submitted to IESG for Publication Jan 2017
Document shepherd Adam Roach
Shepherd write-up Show (last changed 2017-03-02)
IESG IESG state Waiting for AD Go-Ahead
Consensus Boilerplate Yes
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Responsible AD Ben Campbell
Send notices to "Adam Roach" <adam@nostrum.com>
IANA IANA review state IANA - Not OK
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SIPCORE                                                   H. Schulzrinne
Internet-Draft                                                       FCC
Intended status: Standards Track                           March 2, 2017
Expires: September 3, 2017

                 A SIP Response Code for Unwanted Calls
                 draft-ietf-sipcore-status-unwanted-04

Abstract

   This document defines the 666 (Unwanted) SIP response code, allowing
   called parties to indicate that the call or message was unwanted.
   SIP entities may use this information to adjust how future calls from
   this calling party are handled for the called party or more broadly.

Status of This Memo

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   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 3, 2017.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Schulzrinne             Expires September 3, 2017               [Page 1]
Internet-Draft               Status Unwanted                  March 2017

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Normative Language  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Motivation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Behavior of SIP Entities  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   5.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.1.  SIP Response Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.2.  SIP Global Feature-Capability Indicator . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   7.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     8.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     8.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7

1.  Introduction

   In many countries, an increasing number of calls are unwanted
   [RFC5039]: they might be fraudulent, illegal telemarketing or the
   receiving party does not want to be disturbed by, say, surveys or
   solicitation by charities.  Carriers and other service providers may
   want to help their subscribers avoid receiving such calls, using a
   variety of global or user-specific filtering algorithms.  One input
   into such algorithms is user feedback.  User feedback may be offered
   through smartphone apps, APIs or within the context of a SIP-
   initiated call.  This document addresses only the last mode, where
   the called party either rejects the SIP [RFC3261] request, typically
   requests using the INVITE or MESSAGE methods, as unwanted or
   terminates the session with a BYE request after answering the call.
   To allow the called party to express that the call was unwanted, this
   document defines the 666 (Unwanted) response code.  The called user
   agent (UAS), based on input from the called party or some UA-internal
   logic, uses this to indicate that this call is unwanted and that
   future attempts are likely to be similarly rejected.  While factors
   such as identity spoofing and call forwarding may make authoritative
   identification of the calling party difficult or impossible, the
   network can use such a rejection -- possibly combined with a pattern
   of rejections by other callees and/or other information -- as input
   to a heuristic algorithm for determining future call treatment.  The
   heuristic processing and possible treatment of persistently unwanted
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