Advancing ACK Handling for Wireless Transports
draft-li-ack-handling-for-wireless-transports-00

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Internet Congestion Control                                   T. Li, Ed.
Internet-Draft                                             K. Zheng, Ed.
Intended status: Informational                            R. Jadhav, Ed.
Expires: May 1, 2020                                             J. Kang
                                                     Huawei Technologies
                                                        October 29, 2019

             Advancing ACK Handling for Wireless Transports
            draft-li-ack-handling-for-wireless-transports-00

Abstract

   Acknowledgement (ACK) is a basic function and implemented in most of
   the ordered and reliable transport protocols [RFC0793].  Traditional
   ACK is designed with high frequency to guarantee correct interaction
   between sender and receiver.  Delayed byte-counting ACK or periodic
   ACK with large interval are proposed in prior work to reduce ACK
   intensity.

   High-throughput transport over wireless local area network (WLAN)
   becomes a demanding requirement with the emergence of 4K wireless
   projection, VR/AR-based interactive gaming, and more.  However, the
   interference nature of the wireless medium induces an unavoidable
   contention between data transport and backward signaling, such as
   acknowledgement.

   This document presents the problems caused by high-intensity ACK in
   WLAN.  We also analyze the possibility of ACK optimization in WLAN
   and the compatibility issues with existing systems.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 1, 2020.

Li, et al.                 Expires May 1, 2020                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft              ACK for wireless                October 2019

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   3.  Possibility of ACK Optimization on the Transport Layer  . . .   3
   4.  Issues to handle  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  Issues in loss recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Issues in round-trip timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.3.  Issues in send rate control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   7.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     7.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     7.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7

1.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119 [RFC2119].

2.  Problem Statement

   It is well-studied that medium acquisition overhead in WLAN based on
   the IEEE 802.11 medium access control (MAC) protocol [WL] can
   severely hamper TCP throughput, and TCP's many small ACKs are one
   reason [Eugenio][Lynne].  Basically, TCP sends an ACK for every one
   or two incoming data packets.  ACKs share the same medium route with
   data packets, causing similar medium access overhead despite the much
   smaller size of the ACKs [Eitan][RFC4341][Mario][Sara][Ruy].
   Contentions and collisions, as well as the wasted wireless resources

Li, et al.                 Expires May 1, 2020                  [Page 2]
Internet-Draft              ACK for wireless                October 2019
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