Using Short Hierarchical IP Addresses at Edge Networks
draft-song-ship-edge-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Author Haoyu Song 
Last updated 2020-10-20
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Network Working Group                                            H. Song
Internet-Draft                                    Futurewei Technologies
Intended status: Experimental                           October 20, 2020
Expires: April 23, 2021

         Using Short Hierarchical IP Addresses at Edge Networks
                        draft-song-ship-edge-00

Abstract

   To mitigate the IPv6 header overhead in edge networks, this draft
   proposes to use short hierarchical addresses excluding the network
   prefix within edge networks.  An edge network can be organized into a
   hierarchical architecture containing one or more levels of networks.
   The border routers for each hierarchical level are responsible for
   address augmenting and pruning.  Specifically, the top-level border
   routers convert the internal IP header to and from the standard IPv6
   header.  This draft presents an incrementally deployable scheme
   allowing packet header to be effectively compressed in edge networks
   without affecting the network interoperability.

Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "NOT RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and
   "OPTIONAL" in this document are to be interpreted as described in BCP
   14 [RFC2119][RFC8174] when, and only when, they appear in all
   capitals, as shown here.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF).  Note that other groups may also distribute
   working documents as Internet-Drafts.  The list of current Internet-
   Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 23, 2021.

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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.  Code Components extracted from this document must
   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Short Hierarchical Address in Edge Networks . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Edge Network Hierarchy  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.2.  Address Fields  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.3.  Router Roles and Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Deployment and Interoperability Consideration . . . . . . . .   9
     3.1.  Control Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     3.2.  Data Plane  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     3.3.  Using NAT for the edge network  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   5.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   6.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   7.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     7.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     7.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12

1.  Introduction

   Internet of Things (IoT) and 5G introduce to the Internet a huge
   number of addressable entities (e.g., sensors, machines, vehicles,
   and robots).  The transition to IPv6 is inevitable.  While the
   128-bit address of IPv6 was considered large enough and future-proof,
   the long IP addresses inflate the packet header size. 80% of a basic
   IPv6 header is consumed by addresses.

   In IoT networks, thing-to-thing communication through wireless
   connections is dominant, which presents several distinct
   characteristics. (1) The communication pattern is often frequent
   short-message exchanges (e.g., industry robots and networked
   vehicles). (2) The communication is usually energy sensitive (e.g.,

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