BGP Neighbor Autodiscovery
draft-xu-idr-neighbor-autodiscovery-02

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Network Working Group                                              X. Xu
Internet-Draft                                                     K. Bi
Intended status: Standards Track                                  Huawei
Expires: January 4, 2018                                     J. Tantsura
                                                              Individual
                                                            July 3, 2017

                       BGP Neighbor Autodiscovery
                 draft-xu-idr-neighbor-autodiscovery-02

Abstract

   BGP has been used as the routing protocol in many hyper-scale data
   centers.  This document proposes a BGP neighbor autodiscovery
   mechanism that greatly simplifies BGP deployments.  This mechanism is
   very useful for those hyper-scale data centers where BGP is used as
   the routing protocol.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 4, 2018.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2017 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of

Xu, et al.               Expires January 4, 2018                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                                                 July 2017

   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  BGP Hello Message Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  Hello Message Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  HELLO Message Error Handling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     7.1.  BGP Hello Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     7.2.  TLVs of BGP Hello Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     9.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     9.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   BGP has been used as the routing protocol instead of IGP in many
   hyper-scale data centers [RFC7938].  Furthermore, there is an ongoing
   effort to leverages BGP Link-State distribution and the Shortest Path
   First algorithm similar to Internal Gateway Protocols (IGPs) such as
   OSPF [I-D.keyupate-idr-bgp-spf].  In a word, there is a strong
   motivation to replace IGP's by BGP in hyper-scale data centers.

   However, BGP is not good as an IGP from the perspective of deployment
   automation and simplicity.  For instance, the IP address and the
   Autonomous System Number (ASN) of each and every BGP neighbor have to
   be manually configured on BGP routers although these BGP peers are
   directly connected.  In addition, for those directly connected BGP
   routers, it's usually not ideal to establish BGP sessions over their
   directly connected interface addresses due to the following reasons:
   1) it's not convient to do trouble-shooting; 2) the BGP update volume
   is unnecessarily increased when there are multiple physical links
   between them and those links couldn't be configured as a Link
   Aggregtion Group (LAG) due to whatever reason (e.g., diffferent link
   type or speed).  As a result, it's more common that loopback
   interface addresses of those directly connected BGP peers are used
   for BGP session establishment.  To make those loopback addresses of
   directly connected BGP peers reachable from one another, either
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