Mid-Level Networks Potential Technical Services
RFC 1291

Document Type RFC - Informational (December 1991; No errata)
Was draft-aggarwal-services (individual)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream Legacy
Formats plain text ps pdf html bibtex
Stream Legacy state (None)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state RFC 1291 (Informational)
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                        V. Aggarwal
Request for Comments: 1291                      JvNCnet Computer Network
                                                           December 1991

                           Mid-Level Networks
                      Potential Technical Services

Status of this Memo

   This RFC provides information for the Internet community. It does not
   specify an Internet standard. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   This document proposes a set of technical services that each Internet
   mid-level network can offer within the mid-level network itself and
   and to its peer networks. The term "mid-level" is used as a generic
   term to represent all regional and similar networks, which, due to
   continuous evolutions and transitions, can no longer be termed
   "regional" [MAN]. It discusses the pros and cons of offering these
   services, as well as areas in which mid-level networks can work
   together.

   A large portion of the ideas stem from discussions at the IETF
   Operational Statistics (OPstat), User Connectivity Problems (UCP) and
   Network Joint Management (NJM) working groups.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction..................................................   2
   2. The Generic Model.............................................   2
   3. Technical Services............................................   3
   3.1  Domain Name Service.........................................   3
   3.2  Public Domain Software......................................   4
   3.3  Network Time................................................   5
   3.4  Network News................................................   5
   3.5  Mailing Lists...............................................   6
   4. Experimental Testbeds.........................................   6
   5. Network Information Services..................................   7
   6. Network Operations............................................   7
   7. References....................................................   8
   8. Security Considerations.......................................   9
   9. Author's Address..............................................   9
   Appendix A Mailing Lists.........................................  10
   Appendix B DNS Architecture Strategy.............................  10

Aggarwal                                                        [Page 1]
RFC 1291             Potential Technical Services          December 1991

1. Introduction

   Over the past few years, the Internet has grown to be a very large
   entity and its dependability is critical to its users. Furthermore,
   due to the size and nature of the network, the trend has been to
   decentralize as many network functions (such as domain name-service,
   whois, etc.) as possible. Efforts are being made in resource
   discovery [SHHH90] so that the work of researchers is not lost in the
   volumes of data that is available on the Internet.

   A side result of this growth has been the logical structure imposed
   in the Internet of networks classified by function. Tangible examples
   in the present state are the NSFnet national backbone, the mid-
   level/regional networks and campus networks. Each of these can be
   viewed as hierarchies within an organization, each serving a slightly
   different function than the other (campus LANs providing access to
   local resources, mid-level networks providing access to remote
   resources, etc.). The functions of each hierarchy then become the
   "services" offered to the organizational layer below it, who in turn
   depend on these services.

   This document proposes a set of basic technical services that could
   be offered by a mid-level network. These services would not only
   increase the robustness of the mid-level network itself, but would
   also serve to structure the distribution of resources and services
   within the Internet. It also proposes a uniform naming convention for
   locating the hosts offering these services.

2. The Generic Model

   The Internet model that is used as the basis for this document is a
   graph of mid-level networks connected to one another, each in turn
   connecting the campus/organization networks and with the end users
   attached to the campus networks. The model assumes that the mid-level
   networks constitute the highest level of functional division within
   the Internet hierarchy described above (this could change in the
   unforeseen future). With this model in perspective, this document
   addresses the objectives of minimizing unnecessary traffic within the
   Internet as well as making the entire structure as robust as
   possible.

   The proposed structure is a derived extension of organizational LANs
   where certain services are offered within the organizational LAN
   itself, such as nameservice, mail, shared files, single or
   hierarchical points of contact for problems, etc.
Show full document text