Internet Users' Glossary
RFC 1392

Document Type RFC - Informational (January 1993; No errata)
Obsoleted by RFC 1983
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                          G. Malkin
Request for Comments: 1392                                Xylogics, Inc.
FYI: 18                                                 T. LaQuey Parker
                                                                  UTexas
                                                                 Editors
                                                            January 1993

                        Internet Users' Glossary

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  It does
   not specify an Internet standard.  Distribution of this memo is
   unlimited.

Abstract

   There are many networking glossaries in existence.  This glossary
   concentrates on terms which are specific to the Internet.  Naturally,
   there are entries for some basic terms and acronyms because other
   entries refer to them.

Acknowledgements

   This document is the work of the User Glossary Working Group of the
   User Services Area of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).
   Special thanks go to Jon Postel for his definitive definition of
   "datagram".

Table of Contents

   non-letter  . .  2      I . . . . . . . 23      R . . . . . . . 40
   A . . . . . . .  2      J . . . . . . . 29      S . . . . . . . 43
   B . . . . . . .  6      K . . . . . . . 29      T . . . . . . . 45
   C . . . . . . .  9      L . . . . . . . 29      U . . . . . . . 48
   D . . . . . . . 12      M . . . . . . . 30      V . . . . . . . 49
   E . . . . . . . 16      N . . . . . . . 33      W . . . . . . . 49
   F . . . . . . . 18      O . . . . . . . 36      X . . . . . . . 50
   G . . . . . . . 20      P . . . . . . . 37      Y . . . . . . . 51
   H . . . . . . . 21      Q . . . . . . . 40      Z . . . . . . . 51

   References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
   Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

User Glossary Working Group                                     [Page 1]
RFC 1392                   Internet Glossary                January 1993

Glossary

   10BaseT
      A variant of Ethernet which allows stations to be attached via
      twisted pair cable.  See also: Ethernet, twisted pair.

   802.x
      The set of IEEE standards for the definition of LAN protocols.
      See also: IEEE.

   822
      See: RFC 822

   :-)
      This odd symbol is one of the ways a person can portray "mood" in
      the very flat medium of computers--by using "smiley faces".  This
      is "metacommunication", and there are literally hundreds of such
      symbols, from the obvious to the obscure.  This particular example
      expresses "happiness".  Don't see it?  Tilt your head to the left
      90 degrees.  Smiles are also used to denote sarcasm.
      [Source: ZEN]

   abstract syntax
      A description of a data structure that is independent of machine-
      oriented structures and encodings.
      [Source: RFC1208]

   Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1)
      The language used by the OSI protocols for describing abstract
      syntax.  This language is also used to encode SNMP packets.  ASN.1
      is defined in ISO documents 8824.2 and 8825.2.  See also: Basic
      Encoding Rules.

   Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)
      Many transit networks have policies which restrict the use to
      which the network may be put.  A well known example is NSFNET's
      AUP which does not allow commercial use.  Enforcement of AUPs
      varies with the network.  See also: National Science Foundation.

   Access Control List (ACL)
      Most network security systems operate by allowing selective use of
      services.  An Access Control List is the usual means by which
      access to, and denial of, services is controlled.  It is simply a
      list of the services available, each with a list of the hosts
      permitted to use the service.

   ACK
      See: Acknowledgment

User Glossary Working Group                                     [Page 2]
RFC 1392                   Internet Glossary                January 1993

   acknowledgment (ACK)
      A type of message sent to indicate that a block of data arrived at
      its destination without error.  See also: Negative
      Acknowledgement.
      [Source: NNSC]

   ACL
      See: Access Control List

   AD
      See: Administrative Domain

   address
      There are three types of addresses in common use within the
      Internet.  They are email address; IP, internet or Internet
      address; and hardware or MAC address.  See also: email address, IP
      address, internet address, MAC address.

   address mask
      A bit mask used to identify which bits in an IP address correspond
      to the network and subnet portions of the address.  This mask is
      often referred to as the subnet mask because the network portion
      of the address can be determined by the encoding inherent in an IP
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