Principles of Operation for the TPC.INT Subdomain: Radio Paging -- Technical Procedures
RFC 1569

Document Type RFC - Informational (January 1994; No errata)
Obsoleted by RFC 1703
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream Legacy
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream Legacy state (None)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state RFC 1569 (Informational)
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Network Working Group                                            M. Rose
Request for Comments: 1569                  Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.
Category: Informational                                     January 1994

           Principles of Operation for the TPC.INT Subdomain:
                  Radio Paging -- Technical Procedures

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  This memo
   does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of
   this memo is unlimited.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ................................................    1
   2. Naming, Addressing, and Routing .............................    2
   2.1 Addressing .................................................    2
   2.2 Routing ....................................................    3
   3. Procedure ...................................................    3
   3.1 MAILing versus SENDing .....................................    4
   3.2 Latency ....................................................    4
   4. Usage Examples ..............................................    5
   4.1 MIME-based .................................................    5
   4.2 Non-MIME ...................................................    5
   5. Security Considerations .....................................    6
   6. Acknowledgements ............................................    6
   7. References ..................................................    6
   8. Author's Address ............................................    6

1.  Introduction

   As an adjunct to the usual, two-way electronic mail service, it is at
   times useful to employ a one-way text notification service, called
   radio paging.  This memo describes a technique for radio paging using
   the Internet mail infrastructure.  In particular, this memo focuses
   on the case in which radio pagers are identified via the
   international telephone network.

   The technique described by this memo, mapping telephone numbers to
   domain names, is derived from the TPC.INT subdomain.  Consult RFC
   1530, "Principles of Operation for the TPC.INT Subdomain: General
   Principles and Policy" for overview information.

Rose                                                            [Page 1]
RFC 1569          Radio Paging -- Technical Procedures      January 1994

2.  Naming, Addressing, and Routing

   A radio pager is identified by a telephone number, e.g.,

     +1 415 940 8776

   where "+1" indicates the IDDD country code, and the remaining string
   is a telephone number within that country.

2.1.  Addressing

   This number is used to construct the address of a radio pager server,
   which forms the recipient address for the message, e.g., one of:

     pager-alpha@6.7.7.8.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int
     pager-numeric@6.7.7.8.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int

   where the domain-part is constructed by reversing the telephone
   number, converting each digit to a domain-label, and being placed
   under "tpc.int." (The telephone number must not include any
   international access codes.)

   In addition, addresses of the form

     pager.ATOM@6.7.7.8.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int
     pager-alpha.ATOM@6.7.7.8.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int
     pager-numeric.ATOM@6.7.7.8.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int

   where "ATOM" is an (optional) RFC 822 atom [1], are reserved for
   future use.  Note that the mailbox syntax is purposefully restricted
   in the interests of pragmatism.  To paraphrase RFC 822, an atom is
   defined as:

     atom    = 1*atomchar

     atomchar=   <any upper or lowercase alphabetic character
                  (A-Z a-z)>
               / <any digit (0-9)>
               / "!" / "#" / "$" / "%" / "&" / "'" / "*" / "+"
               / "-" / "/" / "=" / "?" / "^" / "_" / "`" / "{"
               / "|" / "}" / "~"

   Finally, note that some Internet mail software (especially gateways
   from outside the Internet) impose stringent limitations on the size
   of a mailbox-string.  Thus, originating user agents should take care
   in limiting the local-part to no more than 70 or so characters.

Rose                                                            [Page 2]
RFC 1569          Radio Paging -- Technical Procedures      January 1994

2.2.  Routing

   The message is routed in exactly the same fashion as all other
   electronic mail, i.e., using the MX algorithm [2].  Since a radio
   pager server might be able to access many radio pagers, the
   wildcarding facilities of the DNS [3,4] are used accordingly.  For
   example, if a radio pager server residing at "dbc.mtview.ca.us" is
   willing to access any radio pager with a telephone number prefix of

     +1 415 940

   then this resource record might be present

     *.0.4.9.5.1.4.1.tpc.int.    IN MX 10 dbc.mtview.ca.us.

   Naturally, if several radio pager servers were willing to access any
   radio pager in that prefix, multiple MX resource records would be
   present.

   It should be noted that the presence of a wildcard RR which matches a
Show full document text