Cabletron's Light-weight Flow Admission Protocol Specification Version 1.0
RFC 2124

Document Type RFC - Informational (March 1997; No errata)
Was draft-rfced-info-amsden (individual)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                          P. Amsden
Request for Comments: 2124                                      J. Amweg
Category: Informational                                        P. Calato
                                                              S. Bensley
                                                                G. Lyons
                                                  Cabletron Systems Inc.
                                                              March 1997

     Cabletron's Light-weight Flow Admission Protocol Specification
                              Version 1.0

Status of this Memo

   This memo provides information for the Internet community.  This memo
   does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.  Distribution of
   this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   Light-weight Flow Admission Protocol, LFAP, allows an external Flow
   Admission Service (FAS) to manage flow admission at the switch,
   allowing flexible Flow Admission Services to be deployed by a vendor
   or customer without changes to, or undue burden on, the switch.

   Specifically, this document specifies the protocol between the switch
   Connection Control Entity (CCE) and the external FAS. Using LFAP, a
   Flow Admission Service can: allow or disallow flows, define the
   parameters under which a given flow is to operate (operating policy)
   or, redirect the flow to an alternate destination. The FAS may also
   maintain details of current or historical flows for billing, capacity
   planning and other purposes.

Table of Contents

1.  Introduction ..................................................    2
2.  Message Flows .................................................    3
3.  Message Contents and Format ...................................    4
     3.1.  IE Formats .............................................    5
     3.2.  Flow Admission Request (FAR) Message ...................   14
     3.3.  Flow Admission Acknowledge (FAA) Message ...............   15
     3.4.  Flow Admission Update (FAU) Message ....................   15
     3.5  Flow Update Notification (FUN) Message ..................   16
     3.6.  Flow Update Acknowledge (FUA) Message ..................   16
     3.7.  Flow Change Request (FCR) Message ......................   17
     3.8.  Flow Change Acknowledge (FCA) Message ..................   17
     3.9.  Administrative Request (AR) Message ....................   18
     3.10.  Administrative Request Acknowledge (ARA) Message ......   18
4.  Error Handling ................................................   18

Amsden, et. al.              Informational                      [Page 1]
RFC 2124                          LFAP                       March 1997

     4.1.  FAA Related Error Handling .............................   19
     4.2.  FUA Related Error Handling .............................   19
     4.3.  FCA Related Error Handling .............................   19
     4.4.  ARA Related Error Handling .............................   20
5.  Security Considerations .......................................   20
6.  Author's Addresses ............................................   20
7.  References ....................................................   21

1.  Introduction

   Light-weight Flow Admission Protocol, LFAP, allows an external Flow
   Admission Service (FAS) to manage flow admission at the switch,
   allowing flexible Flow Admission Services to be deployed by a vendor
   or customer without changes to, or undue burden on, the switch. It
   provides a means for network managers, or management systems, to
   establish connection admission parameters for multiple switches in a
   single management domain by configuring policy information and other
   data via a single centralized connection admission control point.

   Specifically, this document specifies the protocol between the switch
   Connection Control Entity (CCE) and the external FAS. Using LFAP, a
   Flow Admission Service can: allow or disallow flows, define the
   parameters under which a given flow is to operate (operating policy)
   or, redirect the flow to an alternate destination. The FAS may also
   maintain details of current or historical flows for billing, capacity
   planning and other purposes.

   A significant advantage of this protocol is that it relieves switch
   vendors from the complexity of policy enforcement under any number of
   policy representation schemes. Similarly, switch configuration
   managers do not need to translate organization-determined policy or
   usage procedures, limitations and guidelines into an arbitrarily
   large set of vendor-specific representations. Finally, use of such a
   scheme makes possible plug-and-play connection management at the
   present time - in the absence of a standardized representation for
   connection policies.

   This document describes the message flow between switch CCE and FAS,
   the messages used and error handling that applies. This constitutes
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