Unified Layer 2 (L2) Abstractions for Layer 3 (L3)-Driven Fast Handover
RFC 5184

Document Type RFC - Experimental (May 2008; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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IESG IESG state RFC 5184 (Experimental)
Telechat date
Responsible AD Jari Arkko
Send notices to tera@ics.keio.ac.jp, draft-irtf-mobopts-l2-abstractions@ietf.org, rajeev.koodli@nsn.com
Network Working Group                                         F. Teraoka
Request for Comments: 5184                                       K. Gogo
Category: Experimental                                        K. Mitsuya
                                                               R. Shibui
                                                               K. Mitani
                                                         KEIO University
                                                                May 2008

                   Unified Layer 2 (L2) Abstractions
                 for Layer 3 (L3)-Driven Fast Handover

Status of This Memo

   This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet
   community.  It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.
   Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.
   Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

IESG Note

   This document is not an IETF Internet Standard.  It represents the
   consensus of the MOBOPTS Research Group of the Internet Research Task
   Force.  It may be considered for standardization by the IETF in the
   future.

Abstract

   This document proposes unified Layer 2 (L2) abstractions for Layer 3
   (L3)-driven fast handovers.  For efficient network communication, it
   is vital for a protocol layer to know or utilize other layers'
   information, such as the form of L2 triggers.  However, each protocol
   layer is basically designed independently.  Since each protocol layer
   is also implemented independently in current operating systems, it is
   very hard to exchange control information between protocol layers.
   This document defines nine kinds of L2 abstractions in the form of
   "primitives" to achieve fast handovers in the network layer as a
   means of solving the problem.  This mechanism is called "L3-driven
   fast handovers" because the network layer initiates L2 and L3
   handovers by using the primitives.  This document is a product of the
   IP Mobility Optimizations (MobOpts) Research Group.

Teraoka, et al.               Experimental                      [Page 1]
RFC 5184      L2 Abstractions for L3-Driven Fast Handover       May 2008

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................3
   2. Terminology .....................................................3
   3. Primitives for L2 Abstractions ..................................4
   4. Definitions of Primitives .......................................6
      4.1. L2-LinkStatus (Type 1) .....................................6
      4.2. L2-PoAList (Type 1) ........................................6
      4.3. L2-PoAFound (Type 2) .......................................6
      4.4. L2-PoALost (Type 2) ........................................6
      4.5. L2-LinkUp (Type 2) .........................................7
      4.6. L2-LinkDown (Type 2) .......................................7
      4.7. L2-LinkStatusChanged (Type 2) ..............................7
      4.8. L2-LinkConnect (Type 3) ....................................7
      4.9. L2-LinkDisconnect (Type 3) .................................8
   5. Definitions of Static Parameters ................................8
      5.1. Network Interface ID .......................................8
   6. Definitions of Dynamic Parameters ...............................8
      6.1. PoA (Point of Attachment) ..................................8
      6.2. Condition ..................................................8
      6.3. PoA List ...................................................9
      6.4. Enable/Disable .............................................9
      6.5. Ack/Error ..................................................9
   7. Architectural Considerations ....................................9
   8. Security Considerations ........................................13
   9. Acknowledgements ...............................................14
   10. References ....................................................14
      10.1. Normative References .....................................14
      10.2. Informative References ...................................14
   Appendix A.  Example Scenario  ....................................16
   Appendix B.  Example Operation for FMIPv6  ........................17
     B.1.  Example Operation-1 for FMIPv6 ............................18
     B.2.  Example Operation-2 for FMIPv6 ............................20
     B.3.  Experiment ................................................21
   Appendix C.  Example Mapping between L2 Primitives and
                Primitives in IEEE 802.11 and IEEE 802.16e  ..........22
   Appendix D.  Example Mapping of Primitives and IEEE 802.11  .......24
     D.1.  L2-LinkStatus  ............................................24
     D.2.  L2-PoAList ................................................24
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