Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Transport over TCP
RFC 5734

Document Type RFC - Internet Standard (August 2009; Errata)
Obsoletes RFC 4934
Also known as STD 69
Was draft-hollenbeck-rfc4934bis (individual in app area)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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IESG IESG state RFC 5734 (Internet Standard)
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Responsible AD Alexey Melnikov
Send notices to shollenbeck@verisign.com, Ed.Lewis@neustar.biz, chris.newman@sun.com
Network Working Group                                      S. Hollenbeck
Request for Comments: 5734                                VeriSign, Inc.
STD: 69                                                      August 2009
Obsoletes: 4934
Category: Standards Track

       Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP) Transport over TCP

Abstract

   This document describes how an Extensible Provisioning Protocol (EPP)
   session is mapped onto a single Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
   connection.  This mapping requires use of the Transport Layer
   Security (TLS) protocol to protect information exchanged between an
   EPP client and an EPP server.  This document obsoletes RFC 4934.

Status of This Memo

   This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
   Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
   Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
   and status of this protocol.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2009 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents in effect on the date of
   publication of this document (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info).
   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
   and restrictions with respect to this document.

Hollenbeck                  Standards Track                     [Page 1]
RFC 5734                   EPP TCP Transport                 August 2009

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................2
      1.1. Conventions Used in This Document ..........................2
   2. Session Management ..............................................2
   3. Message Exchange ................................................3
   4. Data Unit Format ................................................6
   5. Transport Considerations ........................................6
   6. Internationalization Considerations .............................7
   7. IANA Considerations .............................................7
   8. Security Considerations .........................................7
   9. TLS Usage Profile ...............................................8
   10. Acknowledgements ..............................................11
   11. References ....................................................11
      11.1. Normative References .....................................11
      11.2. Informative References ...................................12
   Appendix A.  Changes from RFC 4934 ................................13

1.  Introduction

   This document describes how the Extensible Provisioning Protocol
   (EPP) is mapped onto a single client-server TCP connection.  Security
   services beyond those defined in EPP are provided by the Transport
   Layer Security (TLS) Protocol [RFC2246].  EPP is described in
   [RFC5730].  TCP is described in [RFC0793].  This document obsoletes
   RFC 4934 [RFC4934].

1.1.  Conventions Used in This Document

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

2.  Session Management

   Mapping EPP session management facilities onto the TCP service is
   straightforward.  An EPP session first requires creation of a TCP
   connection between two peers, one that initiates the connection
   request and one that responds to the connection request.  The
   initiating peer is called the "client", and the responding peer is
   called the "server".  An EPP server MUST listen for TCP connection
   requests on a standard TCP port assigned by IANA.

   The client MUST issue an active OPEN call, specifying the TCP port
   number on which the server is listening for EPP connection attempts.
   The EPP server MUST return an EPP <greeting> to the client after the
   TCP session has been established.

Hollenbeck                  Standards Track                     [Page 2]
RFC 5734                   EPP TCP Transport                 August 2009

   An EPP session is normally ended by the client issuing an EPP
   <logout> command.  A server receiving an EPP <logout> command MUST
   end the EPP session and close the TCP connection with a CLOSE call.
   A client MAY end an EPP session by issuing a CLOSE call.
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