Diversion Indication in SIP
RFC 5806

Document Type RFC - Historic (March 2010; Errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
Stream ISE
Formats plain text pdf html
Stream ISE state (None)
Document shepherd No shepherd assigned
IESG IESG state RFC 5806 (Historic)
Telechat date
Responsible AD Robert Sparks
Send notices to slevy@geom.umn.edu, jyang@synoptics.com, bbyerly@us.ibm.com, draft-levy-sip-diversion@ietf.org, rfc-editor@rfc-editor.org
Independent Submission                                           S. Levy
Request for Comments: 5806                                 Cisco Systems
Category: Historic                                        M. Mohali, Ed.
ISSN: 2070-1721                                              Orange Labs
                                                              March 2010

                      Diversion Indication in SIP

Abstract

   This RFC, which contains the text of an Internet Draft that was
   submitted originally to the SIP Working Group, is being published now
   for the historical record and to provide a reference for later
   Informational RFCs.  The original Abstract follows.

   This document proposes an extension to the Session Initiation
   Protocol (SIP).  This extension provides the ability for the called
   SIP user agent to identify from whom the call was diverted and why
   the call was diverted.  The extension defines a general header,
   Diversion, which conveys the diversion information from other SIP
   user agents and proxies to the called user agent.

   This extension allows enhanced support for various features,
   including Unified Messaging, Third-Party Voicemail, and Automatic
   Call Distribution (ACD).  SIP user agents and SIP proxies that
   receive diversion information may use this as supplemental
   information for feature invocation decisions.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for the historical record.

   This document defines a Historic Document for the Internet community.
   This is a contribution to the RFC Series, independently of any other
   RFC stream.  The RFC Editor has chosen to publish this document at
   its discretion and makes no statement about its value for
   implementation or deployment.  Documents approved for publication by
   the RFC Editor are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5806.

Levy & Mohali                   Historic                        [Page 1]
RFC 5806               Diversion Indication in SIP            March 2010

IESG Note

   This document contains an early proposal to the IETF SIP Working
   Group that was not chosen for standardization.  Discussions on the
   topic resulted in the informational RFC 3325, "Private Extensions to
   the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) for Asserted Identity within
   Trusted Networks", and the standard solution that was chosen can be
   found in RFC 4244, "An Extension to the Session Initiation Protocol
   (SIP) for Request History Information".

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Levy & Mohali                   Historic                        [Page 2]
RFC 5806               Diversion Indication in SIP            March 2010

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................4
   2. Terminology .....................................................4
      2.1. Requirements Language ......................................4
      2.2. Definitions ................................................4
      2.3. Abbreviations ..............................................5
   3. Overview ........................................................5
      3.1. When Is the Diversion Header Used? .........................6
   4. Extension Syntax ................................................6
   5. Detailed Semantics ..............................................7
      5.1. UAS Behavior ...............................................7
      5.2. UAC Behavior ...............................................7
      5.3. Redirect Server Behavior ...................................7
      5.4. Proxy Server Behavior ......................................7
   6. Examples Using Diversion Header .................................8
      6.1. Call Forward Unconditional .................................8
      6.2. Call Forward on Busy ......................................13
      6.3. Call Forward on No-Answer .................................17
      6.4. Call Forward on Unavailable ...............................21
      6.5. Multiple Diversions .......................................24
Show full document text