Service Undiscovery Using Hide-and-Go-Seek for the Domain Pseudonym System (DPS)
RFC 6593

Document Type RFC - Experimental (April 2012; No errata)
Last updated 2013-07-23
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Independent Submission                                      C. Pignataro
Request for Comments: 6593                                     J. Clarke
Category: Experimental                                      G. Salgueiro
ISSN: 2070-1721                                            Cisco Systems
                                                            1 April 2012

               Service Undiscovery Using Hide-and-Go-Seek
                 for the Domain Pseudonym System (DPS)

Abstract

   With the ubiquitous success of service discovery techniques, curious
   clients are faced with an increasing overload of service instances
   and options listed when they browse for services.  A typical domain
   may contain web servers, remote desktop servers, printers, file
   servers, video content servers, automatons, Points of Presence using
   artificial intelligence, etc., all advertising their presence.
   Unsurprisingly, it is expected that some protocols and services will
   choose the comfort of anonymity and avoid discovery.

   This memo describes a new experimental protocol for this purpose
   utilizing the Domain Pseudonym System (DPS), and discusses strategies
   for its successful implementation and deployment.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for examination, experimental implementation, and
   evaluation.

   This document defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet
   community.  This is a contribution to the RFC Series, independently
   of any other RFC stream.  The RFC Editor has chosen to publish this
   document at its discretion and makes no statement about its value for
   implementation or deployment.  Documents approved for publication by
   the RFC Editor are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6593.

Pignataro, et al.             Experimental                      [Page 1]
RFC 6593                Service Hide-and-Go-Seek            1 April 2012

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
     1.1.  Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2.  Procedures Using the Domain Pseudonym System  . . . . . . . . . 3
     2.1.  Count to Live (CTL) for IPv4 and Count Limit (CL) for
           IPv6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
     2.2.  Implicit and Explicit Hiding  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
     2.3.  Timeout State and Finite State Machine for Misbehaving
           Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
     2.4.  Echo  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
     2.5.  Service-as-a-Service (SaaS) Method  . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
     2.6.  Foobar, Mononymous, and other Disguises . . . . . . . . . . 5
     2.7.  Hinting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
     2.8.  Truth or Dare as Disambiguation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   3.  Protocol Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   5.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   6.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   7.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Pignataro, et al.             Experimental                      [Page 2]
RFC 6593                Service Hide-and-Go-Seek            1 April 2012

1.  Introduction

   In today's domains, there are services that, by choice, prefer to not
   be advertised and to cloak themselves with a shroud of anonymity.
   However, protocols do not address the needs of these services.  To
   solve this, we propose a new paradigm of service hide-and-go-seek for
   services that do not want to be discovered.  A client may be looking
   for a service, but an apathetic, playful, overwhelmed, or shy service
   might prefer a hide or hint engagement, instead of directly showing
   itself.

1.1.  Scope

   This document is unscoped, as the scoping service cannot be found.

2.  Procedures Using the Domain Pseudonym System
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