DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation in Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Networks
RFC 6653

Document Type RFC - Informational (July 2012; No errata)
Last updated 2015-10-14
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Independent Submission                                       B. Sarikaya
Request for Comments: 6653                                        F. Xia
Category: Informational                                       Huawei USA
ISSN: 2070-1721                                                 T. Lemon
                                                                 Nominum
                                                               July 2012

     DHCPv6 Prefix Delegation in Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Networks

Abstract

   As interest in IPv6 deployment in cellular networks increases,
   several migration issues have been being raised; IPv6 prefix
   management is the issue addressed in this document.  Based on the
   idea that DHCPv6 servers can manage prefixes, we use DHCPv6 Prefix
   Delegation to address such prefix management issues as an access
   router offloading delegation of prefixes and release tasks to a
   DHCPv6 server.  The access router first requests a prefix for an
   incoming mobile node from the DHCPv6 server.  The access router may
   next do stateless or stateful address allocation to the mobile node,
   e.g., with a Router Advertisement or using DHCP.  We also describe
   prefix management using Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting
   (AAA) servers.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for informational purposes.

   This is a contribution to the RFC Series, independently of any other
   RFC stream.  The RFC Editor has chosen to publish this document at
   its discretion and makes no statement about its value for
   implementation or deployment.  Documents approved for publication by
   the RFC Editor are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc6653.

Sarikaya, et al.              Informational                     [Page 1]
RFC 6653                    Prefix Delegation                  July 2012

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2012 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................3
   2. Terminology and Acronyms ........................................4
   3. Prefix Delegation Using DHCPv6 ..................................5
      3.1. Prefix Request Procedure for Stateless Address
           Configuration ..............................................5
      3.2. Prefix Request Procedure for Stateful Address
           Configuration ..............................................7
      3.3. The MN as Requesting Router in Prefix Delegation ...........8
      3.4. Prefix Release Procedure ...................................9
      3.5. Miscellaneous Considerations ...............................9
           3.5.1. How to Generate an IAID .............................9
           3.5.2. Policy to Delegate Prefixes ........................10
   4. Prefix Delegation Using RADIUS and Diameter ....................10
   5. Security Considerations ........................................11
   6. Acknowledgements ...............................................12
   7. Informative References .........................................12

Sarikaya, et al.              Informational                     [Page 2]
RFC 6653                    Prefix Delegation                  July 2012

1.  Introduction

   Figure 1 illustrates the key elements of a typical cellular access
   network.  In a Long-Term Evolution (LTE) network, the Access Router
   (AR) is the Packet Data Network (PDN) Gateway [3GPP-23401].

                                      +-------------+
                                      |   +------+  |
                                      |   |DHCP  |  |
 +-----+  +-----+  +------+  +------+ |   |Server|  | +------+
 | MN  |--| BS  |--+Access+--+Access+-+   +------+  +-+Border|
 +-----+  +-----+  |  GW  |  |Router| |IP Network(s)| |Router+-Internet
                   +--+---+  +--+---+ |             | +------+
                      |         |     +-------------+
 +-----+  +-----+     |         |    +------+
 | MN  |--| BS  |-----+         |    |AAA   |
 +-----+  +-----+               +--- |Server|
                                     +------+

           Figure 1: Key Elements of a Typical Cellular Network

   The Mobile Node (MN) attaches to a Base Station (BS) through an LTE
   air interface.  A BS manages connectivity of User Equipment (UE) and
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