Considerations on Internet Consolidation and the Internet Architecture
draft-arkko-iab-internet-consolidation-00

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Internet Engineering Task Force                                 J. Arkko
Internet-Draft                                                  Ericsson
Intended status: Informational                               B. Trammell
Expires: April 26, 2019                                       ETH Zurich
                                                           M. Nottingham

                                                              C. Huitema
                                                    Private Octopus Inc.
                                                              M. Thomson
                                                                 Mozilla
                                                             J. Tantsura
                                                          Nuage Networks
                                                        October 23, 2018

 Considerations on Internet Consolidation and the Internet Architecture
               draft-arkko-iab-internet-consolidation-00

Abstract

   Many of us have held a vision of the Internet as the ultimate
   distributed platform that allows communication, the provision of
   services, and competition from any corner of the world.  But as the
   Internet has matured, it seems to also feed the creation of large,
   centralised entities in many areas.  This phenomenon could be looked
   at from many different angles, but this memo considers the topic from
   the perspective of how available technology and Internet architecture
   drives different market directions.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on April 26, 2019.

Arkko, et al.            Expires April 26, 2019                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                Consolidation                 October 2018

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Consolidation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Data- and Capital-intensive Services  . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.3.  Permissionless Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.4.  Fundamentals of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.5.  Technology Factors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   3.  Action  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   4.  Contributors  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   5.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   Many of us have held a vision of the Internet as the ultimate
   distributed platform that allows communication, the provision of
   services, and competition from any corner of the world.  But as the
   Internet has matured, it seems to also feed the creation of large,
   centralised entities in many areas.

   Is Internet traffic consolidating, i.e., moving towards a larger
   fraction of traffic involving a small set of large content providers
   or social networks?  It certainly appears so, though more
   quantitative research on this topic would be welcome.

   This phenomenon could be looked at from many different angles, but
   this memo considers the topic from the perspective of how available
   technology and Internet architecture drives different market
   directions.  How are technology choices and fundamentals of
   communication affecting some of these trends?

Arkko, et al.            Expires April 26, 2019                 [Page 2]
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