Automated IoT Security
draft-garciamorchon-t2trg-automated-iot-security-01

Document Type Expired Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2019-04-22 (latest revision 2018-10-19)
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This Internet-Draft is no longer active. A copy of the expired Internet-Draft can be found at
https://www.ietf.org/archive/id/draft-garciamorchon-t2trg-automated-iot-security-01.txt

Abstract

The Internet of Things (IoT) concept refers to the usage of standard Internet protocols to allow for human-to-thing and thing-to-thing communication. The security needs are well-recognized but the design space of IoT applications and systems is complex and exposed to multiple types of threats. In particular, threats keep evolving at a fast pace while many IoT systems are rarely updated and still remain operational for decades. This document describes a comprehensive agile security framework to integrate existing security processes such as risk assessment or vulnerability assessment in the lifecycle of a smart object in an IoT application. The core of our agile security approach relies on two protocols: the Protocol for Automatic Security Configuration (PASC) and the Protocol for Automatic Vulnerability Assessment (PAVA). PASC is executed during the onboarding phase of a smart object in an IoT system and is in charge of automatically performing a risk assessment and assigning a security configuration - applicable to the device or the system - to defeat the identified risks. The assigned security configuration fits the specific environment and threat model of the application in which the device has been deployed. PAVA is executed during the operation of the IoT object and ensures that vulnerabilities in the smart object and IoT system are discovered in a proactive way. These two protocols can benefit users, manufactures and operators by automating IoT security.

Authors

Oscar Garcia-Morchon (oscar.garcia-morchon@philips.com)
Thorsten Dahm (thorstendlux@google.com)

(Note: The e-mail addresses provided for the authors of this Internet-Draft may no longer be valid.)