In-Network Computing for Managed Networks: Use Cases and Research Challenges
draft-he-coin-managed-networks-01

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COIN                                                               J. He
Internet-Draft                                                A. Li, Ed.
Intended status: Informational                                    Huawei
Expires: January 3, 2020                                    M. Montpetit
                                                          Triangle Video
                                                            July 2, 2019

   In-Network Computing for Managed Networks: Use Cases and Research
                               Challenges
                   draft-he-coin-managed-networks-01

Abstract

   This draft wants to review the existing research and the open issues
   that relate to the addition of data plane programmability in managed
   networks.  While some of the research hypotheses that are at the
   center of in-network-computing have been investigated since the time
   of active networking, recent developments in software defined
   networking, virtualization programmable switches and new network
   programming languages like P4 have generated a new enthusiasm in the
   research community and a flourish of new projects in systems and
   applications alike.  This is what this draft is addressing.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 3, 2020.

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   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents

He, et al.               Expires January 3, 2020                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                                                 July 2019

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  In Network Computing and Data Centers . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  State of the Art in DC Programmability  . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.1.  In-Network Computing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.2.  In-Network Caching  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     3.3.  In Network Consensus  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Industrial Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   5.  Research Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.1.  Data Plane Issues in Managed Networks . . . . . . . . . .  10
     5.2.  Interaction with Transport Protocols  . . . . . . . . . .  10
     5.3.  Interaction with Security Mechanisms  . . . . . . . . . .  10
     5.4.  Privacy aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   6.  Conclusion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   7.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     7.1.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     7.2.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

1.  Introduction

   It is now a given in the computing and networking world that
   traditional approaches to cloud and client-server architectures lead
   to complexity and scalability issues.  New solutions are necessary to
   address the growth of next generation managed network operation (in
   data centers and edge devices alike) including automation, self-
   management, orchestration across components and federation across
   network nodes to enable emerging services and applications.

   Mobility, social network and big data and AI/ML as well as emerging
   content application in the XR (virtual, augmented and mixed reality)
   as well as emerging industrial networking applications require more
   scalable, available and reliable solution not only in real time,
   anywhere and over a wide variety of end devices.  While these
   solutions involve edge resources for computing, rendering and
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