The OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework: JWT Secured Authorization Request (JAR)
draft-ietf-oauth-jwsreq-12

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (oauth WG)
Last updated 2017-02-16 (latest revision 2017-02-13)
Replaces draft-sakimura-oauth-requrl
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Stream WG state Submitted to IESG for Publication Apr 2016
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OAuth Working Group                                          N. Sakimura
Internet-Draft                                 Nomura Research Institute
Intended status: Standards Track                              J. Bradley
Expires: August 17, 2017                                   Ping Identity
                                                       February 13, 2017

The OAuth 2.0 Authorization Framework: JWT Secured Authorization Request
                                 (JAR)
                       draft-ietf-oauth-jwsreq-12

Abstract

   The authorization request in OAuth 2.0 described in RFC 6749 utilizes
   query parameter serialization, which means that Authorization Request
   parameters are encoded in the URI of the request and sent through
   user agents such as web browsers.  While it is easy to implement, it
   means that (a) the communication through the user agents are not
   integrity protected and thus the parameters can be tainted, and (b)
   the source of the communication is not authenticated.  Because of
   these weaknesses, several attacks to the protocol have now been put
   forward.

   This document introduces the ability to send request parameters in a
   JSON Web Token (JWT) instead, which allows the request to be signed
   with JSON Web Signature (JWS) and/or encrypted with JSON Web
   Encryption (JWE) so that the integrity, source authentication and
   confidentiality property of the Authorization Request is attained.
   The request can be sent by value or by reference.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   This Internet-Draft will expire on August 17, 2017.

Sakimura & Bradley       Expires August 17, 2017                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                  OAuth JAR                  February 2017

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.1.  Request Object  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     2.2.  Request Object URI  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Symbols and abbreviated terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   4.  Request Object  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   5.  Authorization Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     5.1.  Passing a Request Object by Value . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     5.2.  Passing a Request Object by Reference . . . . . . . . . .  10
       5.2.1.  URL Referencing the Request Object  . . . . . . . . .  12
       5.2.2.  Request using the "request_uri" Request Parameter . .  13
       5.2.3.  Authorization Server Fetches Request Object . . . . .  13
   6.  Validating JWT-Based Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.1.  Encrypted Request Object  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     6.2.  JWS Signed Request Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
     6.3.  Request Parameter Assembly and Validation . . . . . . . .  14
   7.  Authorization Server Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   8.  TLS Requirements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   9.  IANA  Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   10. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     10.1.  Choice of Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     10.2.  Choice of Parameters to include in the Request Object  .  15
     10.3.  Request Source Authentication  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
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