Privacy considerations for IP broadcast and multicast protocol designers
draft-intarea-broadcast-consider-02

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Internet Engineering Task Force                                R. Winter
Internet-Draft                                                  M. Faath
Intended status: Informational                              F. Weisshaar
Expires: May 4, 2017             University of Applied Sciences Augsburg
                                                        October 31, 2016

Privacy considerations for IP broadcast and multicast protocol designers
                  draft-intarea-broadcast-consider-02

Abstract

   A number of application-layer protocols make use of IP broadcasts or
   multicast messages for functions like local service discovery or name
   resolution.  Some of these functions can only be implemented
   efficiently using such mechanisms.  When using broadcasts or
   multicast messages, a passive observer in the same broadcast/
   multicast domain can trivially record these messages and analyze
   their content.  Therefore, broadcast/multicast protocol designers
   need to take special care when designing their protocols.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 4, 2017.

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   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Winter, et al.             Expires May 4, 2017                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft      Broadcast privacy considerations        October 2016

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Privacy considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
     2.1.  Message frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.2.  Persistent identifiers  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     2.3.  Anticipate user behavior  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.4.  Consider potential correlation  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     2.5.  Configurability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   3.  Operational considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   4.  Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  Other considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10

1.  Introduction

   Broadcast and multicast messages have a large (and to the sender
   unknown) receiver group by design.  Because of that, these two
   mechanisms are vital for a number of basic network functions such as
   auto-configuration.  Application developers use broadcast/multicast
   messages to implement things like local service or peer discovery and
   it appears that an increasing number of applications make use of it.
   And, as RFC 919 [RFC0919] puts it, "The use of broadcasts [...] is a
   good base for many applications".

   Using broadcast/multicast can become problematic if the information
   that is being distributed can be regarded as sensitive or when the
   information that is distributed by multiple of these protocols can be
   correlated in a way that sensitive data can be derived.  This is
   clearly true for any protocol, but broadcast/multicast is special in
   at least two respects:

   (a)  The aforementioned large receiver group, consisting of receivers
        unknown to the sender.  This makes eavesdropping without special
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