Directions for Computing in the Network
draft-kutscher-coinrg-dir-01

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COINRG                                                       D. Kutscher
Internet-Draft                 University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer
Intended status: Experimental                            T. Kaerkkaeinen
Expires: May 7, 2020                                              J. Ott
                                           Technical University Muenchen
                                                       November 04, 2019

                Directions for Computing in the Network
                      draft-kutscher-coinrg-dir-01

Abstract

   In-network computing can be conceived in many different ways - from
   active networking, data plane programmability, running virtualized
   functions, service chaining, to distributed computing.

   This memo proposes a particular direction for Computing in the
   Networking (COIN) research and lists suggested research challenges.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 7, 2020.

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   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

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Kutscher, et al.           Expires May 7, 2020                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   Directions for Computing in the Network   November 2019

   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Computing in the Network vs Networked Computing vs Packet
       Processing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Networked Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.2.  Packet Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.3.  Computing in the Network  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     3.4.  Elements for Computing in the Network . . . . . . . . . .   8
   4.  Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
     4.1.  Compute-First Networking with ICN . . . . . . . . . . . .  11
   5.  Research Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     5.1.  Categorization of Different Use Cases for Computing in
           the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
     5.2.  Networking and Remote-Method-Invocation Abstractions  . .  12
     5.3.  Transport Abstractions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
     5.4.  Programming Abstractions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
     5.5.  Security, Privacy, Trust Model  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
     5.6.  Failure Handling, Debugging, Management . . . . . . . . .  16
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   7.  ChangeLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
     7.1.  01  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   8.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19

1.  Introduction

   Recent advances in platform virtualization, link layer technologies
   and data plane programmability have led to a growing set of use cases
   where computation near users or data consuming applications is needed
   - for example for addressing minimal latency requirements for
   compute-intensive interactive applications (networked Augmented
   Reality, AR), for addressing privacy sensitivity (avoiding raw data
   copies outside a perimeter by processing data locally), and for
   speeding up distributed computation by putting computation at
   convenient places in a network topology.

   In-network computing has mainly been perceived in five variants so
   far: 1) Active Networking [ACTIVE], adapting the per-hop-behavior of
   network elements with respect to packets in flows, 2) Edge Computing
   as an extension of virtual-machine (VM) based platform-as-a-service,
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