Problem Statements for MAC Address Randomization
draft-lee-randomized-macaddr-ps-01

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Authors Yiu Lee  , Jason Livingood  , Jason Weil 
Last updated 2020-09-22
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Internet Engineering Task Force                                   Y. Lee
Internet-Draft                                              J. Livingood
Intended status: Informational                                   Comcast
Expires: 26 March 2021                                           J. Weil
                                                  Charter Communications
                                                       22 September 2020

            Problem Statements for MAC Address Randomization
                   draft-lee-randomized-macaddr-ps-01

Abstract

   MAC Addresses are Link Layer addresses used in IEEE Ethernet, WiFi,
   and other link layer protocols.  A MAC Address is a fixed locally
   unique address assigned by the Network Interface Card (NIC)
   manufacturer, though they may be modified by an operating system, and
   they enable a device to connect to a network.  Due to the static
   nature of a MAC Address, it raises some privacy concerns that have
   led to randomization of MAC Addresses by operating systems.  This
   draft documents the impacts of MAC Address randomization to existing
   use cases of network and application services and proposes few next
   steps IETF may consider working on.

Status of This Memo

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Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2020 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

Lee, et al.               Expires 26 March 2021                 [Page 1]
Internet-Draft              Abbreviated Title             September 2020

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   Please review these documents carefully, as they describe your rights
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Problem Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   Appendix A.  Additional Stuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6

1.  Introduction

   A Network Interface Card (NIC) needs a locally unique address in
   order to connect to a network.  The IEEE [IEEE.802-1D.1993] created
   the Media Access Control (MAC) Address for use by any IEEE 802 link
   layer standard protocols (e.g.  Ethernet & WiFi).  A MAC Address is
   48 bits long and is usually defined in the hardware by the NIC
   manufacturer.  A device can have one or more MAC addresses; for
   example an IoT device may have a single WiFi interface and one MAC
   Address but a laptop may have three interfaces that encompass two
   wired Ethernet ports and a WiFi interface, and therefore will have
   three MAC addresses.  MAC Addresses must be locally unique in order
   for communications to be sent and received by the correct devices.

   The device manufacturer typically assigns the MAC address to an
   interface.  Unless the user or operating system modifies the MAC
   address, which is sometimes the case.  Because of the static nature
   of the manufacturer's MAC addresses, a MAC address is used for device
   identification for a variety of operational and troubleshooting
   reasons in the LAN (e.g., home network).  For example, a MAC address
   can be used to determine to which device on a LAN to permit or deny
   access at a particular time of day (e.g. child's tablet may not
   access Internet after 22:00 hrs until 06:00 hrs).

   Privacy concerns have led some operating systems developers to
   implement MAC Address randomization [IEEE.802.11AQ].  However, this
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