Flow Classification in Information Centric Networking
draft-moiseenko-icnrg-flowclass-02

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ICNRG                                                       I. Moiseenko
Internet-Draft                                             Cisco Systems
Intended status: Informational                                   D. Oran
Expires: January 16, 2019            Network Systems Research and Design
                                                           July 15, 2018

         Flow Classification in Information Centric Networking
                   draft-moiseenko-icnrg-flowclass-02

Abstract

   For the ubiquitous and highly important Internet protocols (TCP, UDP,
   IP), flows are conventionally identified by the "5-tuple" of source
   and destination IP addresses, source and destination port, and
   protocol type in an IP packet.  Information Centric Networking (ICN)
   is a new paradigm where network communications are accomplished by
   requesting named content, instead of sending packets to destination
   addresses.  This document describes mechanisms allowing ICN
   forwarders, consumers, producers and other ICN nodes to encode,
   decode, and process equivalence class identifiers (flows) at any
   desired granularity of a routable name prefix and beyond the routable
   name prefix.  This document is a product of the IRTF Information-
   Centric Networking Research Group (ICNRG).

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on January 16, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

I. Moiseenko & D. Oran  Expires January 16, 2019                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft         Flow Classification in ICN              July 2018

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
     1.1.  Requirements Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   2.  Flow Identification Challenges and Opportunities in ICN . . .   3
   3.  Flow Encoding Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     3.1.  Equivalence class component count (EC3) . . . . . . . . .   5
     3.2.  Equivalence class name component type (ECNCT) . . . . . .   6
   4.  Producer operation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  Consumer operation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Forwarder operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  Normative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9

1.  Introduction

   The problem of identifying groups of packets that get consistent
   treatment in a network and allowing that treatment to be independent
   and isolated from the treatment of other groups of packets, is
   ubiquitous and long-standing.  The purposes to which this
   identification can be put is highly varied, including such functions
   are providing differentiated quality of service, traffic engineering,
   traffic filtering for security functions like intrusion detection and
   firewalling, etc.

   Providing the capability to apply different functions to groupings
   (formally equivalence classes) of packets is generally known as the
   "flow identification problem" where the definition of what
   constitutes a "flow" is highly dependent on the particular protocol
   or protocols carrying the packets.  Some of the above uses of flows
   also bring a mechanism requirement that the flow identification
   technique be useful to have not just equivalence classes, but the
   ability to apply some useful notion of fairness among the instances
   of each equivalence class.  There are many possible flow
   identification techniques that are either too granular (spatially or
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