Internet Protocol Mixture (IPmix) Specification
draft-omar-ipmix-01

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Network Working Group                                            K. Omar
Internet-Draft                                                  The Road
Intended status: Standards Track                       November 13, 2018
Expires: May 17, 2019

            Internet Protocol Mixture (IPmix) Specification
                          draft-omar-ipmix-01

Abstract

   This document specifies the Internet Protocol Mixture (IPmix). a
   solution that allows IPv4-only hosts to communicate with IPv6-only
   hosts and vice versa.

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 17, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
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   described in the Simplified BSD License.

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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Notational Conventions and Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   3.  Internet Protocol Mixture (IPmix) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  The Four Types of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  IPmix: IPv6 Host to IPv4 Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  IPmix: IPv4 Host to IPv6 Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     4.3.  IPmix: IPv6 Host to IPv6 Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
     4.4.  IPmix: IPv4 Host to IPv4 Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   5.  IPmix Packet Header Format  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12
   6.  Advantages of IPmix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13
   7.  IPv10 with DNS  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  14
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   9.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   10. Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15
   11. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
     11.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
     11.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16
   Author's Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16

1.  Introduction

   IPmix is a solution designed to allow IP version 6 [RFC2460] to
   communicate to IP version 4 (IPv4) [RFC791] and vice versa.

   Internet is the global wide network used for communication between
   hosts connected to it.

   These connected hosts (PCs, servers, routers, mobile devices, etc.)
   must have a global unique addresses to be able to communicate through
   the Internet and these unique addresses are defined in the Internet
   Protocol (IP).

   The first version of the Internet Protocol is IPv4. - When IPv4 was
   developed in 1975, it was not expected that the number of connected
   hosts to the Internet reach a very huge number of hosts more than the
   IPv4 address space, also it was aimed to be used for experimental
   purposes in the beginning. - IPv4 is (32-bits) address allowing
   approximately 4.3 billion unique IP addresses.

   A few years ago, with the massive increase of connected hosts to the
   Internet, IPv4 addresses started to run out.

   Three short-term solutions (CIDR, Private addressing, and NAT) were
   introduced in the mid-1990s but even with using these solutions, the
   IPv4 address space ran out in February, 2011 as announced by IANA,

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   The announcement of depletion of the IPv4 address space by the RIRs
   is as follows:

   o  April, 2011: APNIC announcement.

   o  September, 2012: RIPE NCC announcement.

   o  June, 2014: LACNIC announcement.
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