Messaging Use Cases for STIR
draft-peterson-stir-messaging-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (candidate for stir WG)
Authors Jon Peterson  , Chris Wendt 
Last updated 2020-11-20 (latest revision 2020-11-02)
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Network Working Group                                        J. Peterson
Internet-Draft                                                   Neustar
Intended status: Informational                                  C. Wendt
Expires: May 6, 2021                                             Comcast
                                                        November 2, 2020

                      Messaging Use Cases for STIR
                    draft-peterson-stir-messaging-00

Abstract

   Secure Telephone Identity Revisited (STIR) provides a means of
   attesting the identity of a telephone caller via a signed token in
   order to prevent impersonation of a calling party number, which is a
   key enabler for illegal robocalling.  Similar impersonation is
   leveraged by bad actors in the text messaging space.  This document
   considers the applicability of STIR's Persona Assertion Token
   (PASSporT) and certificate issuance framework to instant text and
   multimedia messaging use cases, both for messages carried or
   negotiated by SIP, and for non-SIP messaging.

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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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Peterson & Wendt           Expires May 6, 2021                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft               STIR Messaging                November 2020

   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Applicability to Messaging Systems  . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   4.  PASSporTs and Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
     4.1.  PASSporTs Conveyance with Messaging . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Certificates and Messaging  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   6.  Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     7.1.  JSON Web Token Claims Registration  . . . . . . . . . . .   6
     7.2.  PASSporT Type Registration  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   9.  Informative References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8

1.  Introduction

   The STIR problem statement [RFC7340] describes widespread problems
   enabled by impersonation in the telephone network, including illegal
   robocalling, voicemail hacking, and swatting.  As telephone services
   are increasingly migrating onto the Internet and using Voice over IP
   (VoIP) protocols such as SIP [RFC3261], it is necessary for these
   protocols to support stronger identity mechanisms to prevent
   impersonation.  [RFC8224] defines a SIP Identity header field capable
   of carrying PASSporT [RFC8225] objects in SIP as a means to
   cryptographically attest that the originator of a telephone call is
   authorized to use the calling party number (or, for native SIP cases,
   SIP URI) associated with the originator of the call.

   The problem of bulk, unsolicited commercial communications is not
   however limited to telephone calls.  Increasingly, spammers and
   fraudsters are turning to messaging applications to deliver undesired
   content to consumers.  In some respects, mitigating these unwanted
   messages resembles the email spam problem: textual analysis of the
   message contents can be used to fingerprint content that is generated
   by spammers, for example.  However, encrypted messaging is becoming
   more common, and analysis of message contents may no longer be a
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