Anonymity, Human Rights and Internet Protocols
draft-tenoever-hrpc-anonymity-01

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Human Rights Protocol Considerations Research Group        S. Bortzmeyer
Internet-Draft                                                     AFNIC
Intended status: Informational                              N. ten Oever
Expires: May 16, 2018                                         ARTICLE 19
                                                       November 12, 2017

             Anonymity, Human Rights and Internet Protocols
                    draft-tenoever-hrpc-anonymity-01

Abstract

   Anonymity is less discussed in the IETF than for instance security
   [RFC3552] or privacy [RFC6973].  This can be attributed to the fact
   anonymity is a hard technical problem or that anonymizing user data
   is not of specific market interest.  It remains a fact that 'most
   internet users would like to be anonymous online at least
   occasionally' [Pew].

   This document aims to break down the different meanings and
   implications of anonymity on a mediated computer network.

Status of This Memo

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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 16, 2018.

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   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents

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   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
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Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Vocabulary Used . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Should protocols promote anonymity? . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4
   4.  Example of use cases  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  Simultaneous use  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Successive use  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   5.  Practical advices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.1.  Protocol developers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     5.2.  Protocol implementors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   6.  Open Questions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   7.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   6
   8.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   9.  Research Group Information  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   10. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     10.1.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
     10.2.  URIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9

1.  Introduction

   There seems to be a clear need for anonymity online in an environment
   where harassment on the Internet is on the increase [Pew2] and the UN
   Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression calls anonymity
   'necessary for the exercise of the right to freedom of opinion and
   expression in the digital age' [UNHRC2015].

   Nonetheless anonymity is not getting much discussion at the IETF,
   providing anonymity does not seem a (semi-)objective for many
   protocols, even though several documents contribute to improving
   anonymity such as [RFC7258], [RFC7626], [RFC7858].

   There are initiatives on the Internet to improve end users anonymity,
   most notably [torproject], but these initiatives rely on adding
   encryption in the application layer.

   This document aims to break down the different meanings and
   implications of anonymity on a mediated computer network and to see
   whether (some parts of) anonymity should be taken into consideration
   in protocol development.

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2.  Vocabulary Used
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