Network Coding Function Virtualization
draft-vazquez-nfvrg-netcod-function-virtualization-00

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NFVRG                                               M. A. Vazquez-Castro
Internet-Draft                                                 T. Do-Duy
Intended status: Informational                                       UAB
Expires: May 17, 2017                                          P. Saxena
                                                             M. Vikstrom
                                                                   AnsuR
                                                       November 13, 2016

                 Network Coding Function Virtualization
         draft-vazquez-nfvrg-netcod-function-virtualization-00

Abstract

   This document describes network coding as a network function.  It
   also describes how a network coding function can be virtualized and
   integrated with virtual network functions architectures.  The network
   coding function is not a traditionally implemented network function
   in dedicated hardware as those that have triggered network function
   virtualization.  It refers to a novel network functionality that
   generalizes classic packet-level end-to-end coding.  Classic packet-
   level end-to-end coding helps in the provision of quality of service
   by trading off delay and reliability.  Network coding goes beyond
   that by enabling in-network optimized re-encoding, which can provide
   both throughput gains and diverse network-controlled degrees of
   reliability.  Consequently, a virtualized network coding function can
   serve as a flow engineering tool over virtualized networks (e.g. over
   network slices).

Status of This Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
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   This Internet-Draft will expire on May 17, 2017.

A. Vazquez-Castro, et al. Expires May 17, 2017                  [Page 1]
Internet-Draft   Network Coding Function Virtualization    November 2016

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2016 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
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   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
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   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   2
   2.  Conventions used in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   3
   3.  Network coding as a network function  . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
   4.  Virtual Network Coding Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.1.  Virtualization of flows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   5
     4.2.  Integration with ETSI NFV architecture  . . . . . . . . .   6
     4.3.  Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   7
   5.  Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   6.  Acknowledgements  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   8
   7.  IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   8.  Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
   9.  References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.1.  Normative Information References  . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.2.  Conceptual ground basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   9
     9.3.  Application references  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  10
   Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  11

1.  Introduction

   Network coding(NC) is a novel technology that can be seen as the
   generalization of classic point to point coding to coding for network
   flows.  As with classic coding, both information theoretical and
   algebraic codes literature provide the conceptual solid basis of NC.
   Such conceptual basis has clarified NC benefits and corresponding
   tradeoffs, which need to be considered in practical implementations
   of the technology.

   NC does not replace end-to-end (packet-level block) coding, which is
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