SoniTalk: An Open Protocol for Data-Over-Sound Communication
draft-zeppelzauer-data-over-sound-00

Document Type Active Internet-Draft (individual)
Last updated 2019-04-22 (latest revision 2019-03-06)
Stream (None)
Intended RFC status (None)
Formats plain text pdf html bibtex
Stream Stream state (No stream defined)
Consensus Boilerplate Unknown
RFC Editor Note (None)
IESG IESG state I-D Exists
Telechat date
Responsible AD (None)
Send notices to (None)
Internet Draft                                           M. Zeppelzauer
Intended status: Experimental                                 A. Ringot
Expires: September 2019                                 St. Poelten UAS
                                                          March 6, 2019

       SoniTalk: An Open Protocol for Data-Over-Sound Communication
                 draft-zeppelzauer-data-over-sound-00.txt

Status of this Memo

   This Internet-Draft is submitted in full conformance with the
   provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. This document may not be modified,
   and derivative works of it may not be created, except to publish it
   as an RFC and to translate it into languages other than English.

   Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
   Task Force (IETF), its areas, and its working groups.  Note that
   other groups may also distribute working documents as Internet-
   Drafts.

   Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
   and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
   time.  It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
   material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."

   The list of current Internet-Drafts can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/ietf/1id-abstracts.txt

   The list of Internet-Draft Shadow Directories can be accessed at
   http://www.ietf.org/shadow.html

   This Internet-Draft will expire on September 6, 2019.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2019 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors. All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document. Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document. Code Components extracted from this document must

 Zeppelzauer, Ringot  Expires September 6, 2019                [Page 1]
Internet-Draft                 SoniTalk                      March 2019

   include Simplified BSD License text as described in Section 4.e of
   the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without warranty as
   described in the Simplified BSD License.

Abstract

   This document defines a new protocol for communication via sound (and
   in particular via near-ultrasound) that is simple enough to be
   implemented on devices with limited computational resources, such as
   Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices.  The near-ultrasonic frequency band
   in the range of 18-22kHz represents a novel and so far hardly used
   channel for the communication of different devices, such as mobile
   phones, computers, TVs, personal assistants, and potentially a wide
   range of IoT devices.  Moreover, data-over-sound enables to connect
   low-end hardware devices to the Internet by near field communication
   with other Internet-connected devices.  Data-over-sound requires only
   a standard loudspeaker and a microphone for communication, and thus
   has very low hardware requirements compared to other communication
   standards such as Bluetooth, WLAN and NFC.  "SoniTalk" is designed as
   an open and transparent near-ultrasonic data transmission protocol
   for data-over-sound.  This document provides a specification of the
   protocol at the lowest layer (physical layer) in the sense of the OSI
   model.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction...................................................2
   2. Details........................................................3
   3. Security Considerations........................................6
   4. IANA Considerations............................................7
   5. Conclusions....................................................7
   6. References.....................................................7
      6.1. Normative References......................................7
      6.2. Informative References....................................7
   7. Acknowledgments................................................7
   Authors' Addresses................................................9

1. Introduction

   The typical frequency band for data-over-sound starts at 18kHz.  This
   band can be corrupted by noise from the environment, which requires a
   number of counter measures to ensure a robust signal transmission.
   Especially the temporally varying characteristics of the channel
   makes the transmission of messages over longer time-spans more likely
   to be corrupted.  The proposed protocol tries to mitigate these
   sources of error by including redundancy in the encoding.  Redundancy

Zeppelzauer, Ringot   Expires September 6, 2019                [Page 2]
Internet-Draft                 SoniTalk                      March 2019

   is generated by encoding each bit in terms of a Manchester code with
   a transition from high to low (and vice versa) for bit 1 and 0,
Show full document text