A Tagged Index Object for use in the Common Indexing Protocol
RFC 2654

Document Type RFC - Experimental (August 1999; No errata)
Last updated 2013-03-02
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Network Working Group                                      R. Hedberg
Request for Comments: 2654                                  Catalogix
Category: Experimental                                  B. Greenblatt
                       Directory Tools and Application Services, Inc.
                                                             R. Moats
                                                                 AT&T
                                                              M. Wahl
                                         Innosoft International, Inc.
                                                          August 1999

     A Tagged Index Object for use in the Common Indexing Protocol

Status of this Memo

   This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet
   community.  It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind.
   Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.
   Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (1999).  All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

   This document defines a mechanism by which information servers can
   exchange indices of information from their databases by making use of
   the Common Indexing Protocol (CIP).  This document defines the
   structure of the index information being exchanged, as well as the
   appropriate meanings for the headers that are defined in the Common
   Indexing Protocol.  It is assumed that the structures defined here
   can be used by X.500 DSAs, LDAP servers, Whois++ servers, CSO Ph
   servers and many others.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
   2. Background  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   3. Object  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   4. The Tagged Index Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   4.1. The Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   4.2. Content Type  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   4.3 Tagged Index BNF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
   4.3.1. Header Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
   4.3.2. Tokenization types  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
   4.3.3. Tag Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
   4.4. Incremental Indexing  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Hedberg, et al.               Experimental                      [Page 1]
RFC 2654           Tagged Index Object for use in CIP        August 1999

   5. Examples  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
   5.1 The original database  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
   5.1.1 "complete" consistency based full update . . . . . . . . . .14
   5.1.2 "tag" consistency based full update  . . . . . . . . . . . .14
   5.1.3 "unique" consistency based full update . . . . . . . . . . .15
   5.2 First update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
   5.2.1 "complete" consistency based incremental update  . . . . . .16
   5.2.2 "tag" consistency based incremental update   . . . . . . . .17
   5.2.3 "unique" consistency based incremental update  . . . . . . .17
   5.3 Second update  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
   5.3.1 "complete" consistency based incremental update  . . . . . .18
   5.3.2 "tag" consistency based incremental update . . . . . . . . .19
   5.3.3 "unique" consistency based incremental update  . . . . . . .20
   6. Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   6.1 Aggregation of Tagged Index Objects  . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   7. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
   8. References  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
   9. Authors' Addresses  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
   Full Copyright Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

1. Introduction

   The Common Indexing Protocol (CIP) as defined in [1] proposes a
   mechanism for distributing searches across several instances of a
   single type of search engine to create a global directory.  CIP
   provides a scalable, flexible scheme to tie individual databases into
   distributed data warehouses that can scale gracefully with the growth
   of the Internet.  CIP provides a mechanism for meeting these goals
   that is independent of the access method that is used to access the
   data that underlies the indices.  Separate from CIP is the definition
   of the Index Object that is used to contain the information that is
   exchanged among Index Servers.  One such Index Object that has
   already been defined is the Centroid that is derived from the Whois++
   protocol [2].

   The Centroid does not meet all the requirements for the exchange of
   index information amongst information servers.  For example, it does
   not support the notion of incremental updates natively.  For
   information servers that contain millions of records in their
   database, constant exchange of complete dredges of the database is
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